Mod+ 19-year-old girl wakes up during brain surgery, asks doctors ‘How’s it going?’

#1
http://www.foxnews.com/health/2015/...ing-brain-surgery-asks-doctors-hows-it-going/
A teenage girl in Poland woke up during brain surgery and asked her doctors how the operation was going...
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Doctors say she woke up halfway through the surgery when the anesthetic wore off. Her brain was exposed ...

“Despite coming round, she didn’t feel anything and was never in danger,” neurosurgeon Dawid Larysz told The Daily Mirror.
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Jasica doesn’t remember waking up during the surgery.
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Other experts told The Daily Mirror that the operation itself could have triggered her waking up despite the anesthetic
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While chatting with doctors during the procedure, Jasica reportedly brought up cats.
 
#3
Could be like talking in your sleep. Except that someone is doing things to your brain while you are talking. Its dissapointing that there are no informations of the state of her brain during that event. But well, shes fine and thats important, right?
 
#4
Keeping people awake during brain surgery is not that unusual though - at least in peripheral surgery - but even in deeper brains surgery for tumors etc. When they go in there they want to monitor the reactions via the patient, so they dont mess up "important" parts of the brain.

During surgery, the neurosurgeon will stimulate the area around the tumor with small electrodes. To precisely locate the functional areas of the brain that must be avoided, the neurosurgeon will ask the patient to perform tasks such as talking, counting and looking at pictures.

The neurosurgeon will use computer images of the brain taken before and during the procedure and the patient’s responses to create a map of the functional areas of the brain. The neurosurgeon then removes as much of the tumor as possible while avoiding the functional areas of the brain.

Throughout the procedure, the neuroanesthesiologist will ensure that the patient does not feel any pain, monitor vital signs (heart rate, breathing, and blood pressure) and talk to the patient to help the patient remain calm.
http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/neur.../ionm/types/intraoperative-brain-mapping.html
 
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