Accounts From Other Realities

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Sciborg_S_Patel

#1
A thread for the various realities - Astral Plane, Heaven, Hell, DMT Hyperspace, and so on - people have claimed to have encountered.

The Other Side of the Moon Gate

Dark within dark. It fills my mind. I don’t know how my fall is broken or how I rediscover myself laid out on a bed of soft ferns and grasses, but soon none of that matters because I am surrounded by warmth and love. The people who tend me are very tall and very slender. They bend like flowers. Their skin is silvery and they glow with an inner light that radiates from the center of the chest. I don’t think they are wearing clothes, but this is in no way shocking to me. They hold a bowl to my mouth and encourage me to drink. The juice is delicious; it reminds me of mangoes and passion fruit and wild berries all at once.

They are working on my body. Their fingers are very long and play me like a stringed instrument. I have the sense that they are adjusting my form. I can see my toes growing longer, like theirs, which are as long as their fingers. They are singing over me, and the music brings tears of joy. I know this song, or its sister. I know I am home.

There is no measurement of time in this world, apart from the changing colors of the great Tree of Life at the center of all...
 
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Sciborg_S_Patel

#2
Erowid Experience Vaults: Ayahuasca Main Index

DMT and Hyperspace - Deoxy

The world of ordinary, common, experience has three spatial dimensions and one temporal dimension, forming a place and time for the apparent persistence of solid objects. Since this is a world of experience it belongs more to experience than to being. The being, or ontological nature, of this world may be quite different from what we experience it as.

Psychedelic experience strongly suggests that (as William James hypothesized) ordinary experience is an island in a sea of possible modes of consciousness. Under the influence of substances such as LSD and psilocybin we venture outside of the world as commonly viewed and enter spaces which may be very strange indeed. This happens as a result of changing our brain chemistry. Why then should we not regard ordinary experience too as a result of a particular mode of brain chemstry? Perhaps the world of ordinary experience is not a faithful representation of physical reality but rather is physical reality represented in the manner of ordinary brain functioning. By taking this idea seriously we may free our understanding of physical reality from the limitatons imposed by the unthinking assumption that ordinary experience represents physical reality as it is. In fact physical reality may be totally bizarre and quite unlike anything we have thought it to be.
https://www.erowid.org/experiences/subs/exp_Ayahuasca.shtml
 
#3
People who travel out of body are convinced that these 'other realities' are where we go when we die, depending on our conscious 'level' when we pass. Jurgen Ziewe (multidimensionalman.com), Frank Kepple and others have described them. Tom Campbell 'knows' this is the case but doesn't think describing his own adventures would be useful to his cause.

I think they may be right - but have no evidence( that I can remember ;)).
 
S

Sciborg_S_Patel

#5
I think they may be right - but have no evidence( that I can remember ;)).
It is said - and it is true - that just before we are born a cavern angel holds his finger to our mouths and whispers: "Hush! Don't tell them what you know."
-
Roderick MacLeish, Prince Ombra

Yeah, I think it's impossible to judge these claims from the outside, barring veridical info. Even then one may not be sure. As a child I experienced some low key "softness" between the material and dreaming worlds, but when I look back I'm not sure what to think. Just fabricated experiences in which I mixed up memory and dreaming?

The most telling is the birthmark on my pinky, which I think I received via a dream when I was about 4 or 5. Seems like when you're really young it isn't hard to mix up memories with dreams, as this has happened to me when I recall supposed events from when I was a toddler that I later am forced to conclude are dreams.

Yet 4 to 5 feels a little too old for such confabulation, and there's at least one other incident when I was older involving some books on mythology....probably a subject for another thread though.

=-=-=
Experiences in Dreams and in the Astral Plane

Why are these dreams and other experiences in this astral plane so symbolic?

Because symbolism is a universal language; it’s used in the higher dimensions and therefore in dreams. There are things which can be said in symbols that can’t be said in words. Words are limited in the wisdom they can convey, whereas symbols can have a greater depth and meaning.
 
#6
It is said - and it is true - that just before we are born a cavern angel holds his finger to our mouths and whispers: "Hush! Don't tell them what you know."
-
Roderick MacLeish, Prince Ombra

Yeah, I think it's impossible to judge these claims from the outside, barring veridical info. Even then one may not be sure. As a child I experienced some low key "softness" between the material and dreaming worlds, but when I look back I'm not sure what to think. Just fabricated experiences in which I mixed up memory and dreaming?

The most telling is the birthmark on my pinky, which I think I received via a dream when I was about 4 or 5. Seems like when you're really young it isn't hard to mix up memories with dreams, as this has happened to me when I recall supposed events from when I was a toddler that I later am forced to conclude are dreams.

Yet 4 to 5 feels a little too old for such confabulation, and there's at least one other incident when I was older involving some books on mythology....probably a subject for another thread though.

=-=-=
Experiences in Dreams and in the Astral Plane




I have always wondered about what "dreams" really where. I think one thing in my opinion that materialism has a harder time explaining are so called dreams which feel just as real as this waking reality that we live in. What is real? Why is a reality that you visit in an out of body experience where it has all the characteristics of walking reality any less "real"? What is real? If its all happening in your head. why aren't there any signs that it is happening in your head? This goes back to the whole universe inside the skull thing which Bernardo touches on... Or people who claim to visit worlds with indescribable shapes, colors etc. How could a brain hallucinate shapes and colors that have not been seen or perceived by the sense organs? It is difficult for me to believe that this so called material world is the only reality.. our sense organs are so dull and primitive..

I think there are other realities that are probably very bizarre and inexplicable compared to ours......
 
C

chuck.drake

#7
I have always wondered about what "dreams" really where. I think one thing in my opinion that materialism has a harder time explaining are so called dreams which feel just as real as this waking reality that we live in. What is real? Why is a reality that you visit in an out of body experience where it has all the characteristics of walking reality any less "real"? What is real? If its all happening in your head. why aren't there any signs that it is happening in your head? This goes back to the whole universe inside the skull thing which Bernardo touches on... Or people who claim to visit worlds with indescribable shapes, colors etc. How could a brain hallucinate shapes and colors that have not been seen or perceived by the sense organs? It is difficult for me to believe that this so called material world is the only reality.. our sense organs are so dull and primitive..

I think there are other realities that are probably very bizarre and inexplicable compared to ours......
I have lately begun working again in earnest on dreaming. I have been recording my dreams again and consequently I am remembering many dreams each night and in much more detail. I am struck by the variety and import on a near nightly basis. I do not know what dreams are--whether they are simply mechanical wheels dipping into my subconscious mind or if they are something greater, perhaps some shared or guided reality. But if they are only intended to be problem solving and reconciliation as so many believe, then why the indescribable variation each night? Wouldn't dreams tend to repeat and present similar or at least parallel lines of development if that were the case? Every night an entirely new cast of characters. Every night an utterly unique setting and action. Unbelievable in a way. The ability of the mind's eye to unfold another reality part and parcel is truly one of the most amazing phenomena of consciousness.
 
#8
chuck

I, too, am amazed by my dreams. I write them down when I can remember them and try to find reasons why I get mixed results, sometimes they are really vivid and memorable, mostly though they are quickly forgotten and only vague ? I could never imagine myself dreaming such scenarios up if they weren't dreams !

I want to try Lucid dreaming as there are meant to be really strong visualisation possibilities for getting my right hand back, I don't really mind how useless it is, but if I could play the bass somehow I would be very thankful. The other day I found myself looking at this tall banking in front of me thinking 'I'm dreaming!' then getting excited and immediately waking up - still, bit by bit.

I'm sure we are just scratching the surface of the potential to be found ?
 
C

chuck.drake

#9
chuck

I, too, am amazed by my dreams. I write them down when I can remember them and try to find reasons why I get mixed results, sometimes they are really vivid and memorable, mostly though they are quickly forgotten and only vague ? I could never imagine myself dreaming such scenarios up if they weren't dreams !

I want to try Lucid dreaming as there are meant to be really strong visualisation possibilities for getting my right hand back, I don't really mind how useless it is, but if I could play the bass somehow I would be very thankful. The other day I found myself looking at this tall banking in front of me thinking 'I'm dreaming!' then getting excited and immediately waking up - still, bit by bit.

I'm sure we are just scratching the surface of the potential to be found ?
I too find that there are mixed results in remembering my dreams. I'm hoping that over the long term, with continued diligence in recording them, that recall will become more consistent. I think also that some nights, depending on how your sleep was, the dreams may be more vivid or memorable.

I've had some small success with lucid dreaming. I occasionally have them and sometimes I can have the amount of awareness necessary to really do something cool. I've done quite a bit of thinking about lucid dreaming and the OBE. I think there is a difference between having them on occasion and being able to master them enough to develop some consistency and higher levels of awareness within the state. My current thinking is that what is required are much higher levels of concentration and visualization skills than we would normally enjoy. There are concentration, visualization and meditation practices to develop these skills. It may be a long road, but the ability to have the ability to enter these states with greater ease and control would be an amazing thing to behold.
 
#10
I'm planning on writing a post about my experience with lucid dreaming, but I thought I'd now share an experience I had that is relevant.

I'll start off by saying I am an experienced lucid dreamer; I've run the gamut of dream related experience: false awakening, sleep paralysis, etc. But this one experience has happened only once.

I awoke in my bed with the sun shining through the curtains; but I could not move any part of my body except my eyes, I wasn't frightened as I've been through sleep paralysis a number of times. What made this experience so strange was that when I closed my eyes my perceptions immediately changed; I could no longer feel the pillow on the side of my face or the sheets on my body. My eyes were still closed and I couldn't see. I knew I was no longer lying down, but standing up. Picture lying down and then standing up with your eyes remaining closed. That was the feeling, but it was instant from lying to standing. I opened my eyes and was back in bed, but still unable to move. I closed my eyes again, and felt the change in perceptions, but still couldn't see so I felt my surroundings and determined I was standing next to my bed. In my bedroom there's a door that opens to a balcony that is right next to my bed. I felt for the door handle, got my hand on it and opened it. I stepped outside and felt a rush of warm air and the sun shining on my skin; strange since in reality it was the middle of winter. I reached out for the railing and when I touched it I felt the heat from metal that has been sitting in the sun. I could hear kids playing on the street below me; I took a deep breath of fresh air and opened my eyes hoping to see this summer scene, but when I did I was back in bed.

I then started opening and closing my eyes rapidly and each time I did I felt the change in perceptions. It was like being in two different realties. In one I could do everything but see, in the other I could see but do nothing else. Eventually when I closed my eyes there was no change, and then it wasn't long before the sleep paralysis wore off and I could move again. It wasn't like waking up again as in a false awakening; I just could move again in the one reality. I got out of bed, looked out the window, and was disappointed to see it was snowing.

I don't really know what to make of the whole thing.
 
#11
I'm planning on writing a post about my experience with lucid dreaming, but I thought I'd now share an experience I had that is relevant.

I'll start off by saying I am an experienced lucid dreamer; I've run the gamut of dream related experience: false awakening, sleep paralysis, etc. But this one experience has happened only once.

I awoke in my bed with the sun shining through the curtains; but I could not move any part of my body except my eyes, I wasn't frightened as I've been through sleep paralysis a number of times. What made this experience so strange was that when I closed my eyes my perceptions immediately changed; I could no longer feel the pillow on the side of my face or the sheets on my body. My eyes were still closed and I couldn't see. I knew I was no longer lying down, but standing up. Picture lying down and then standing up with your eyes remaining closed. That was the feeling, but it was instant from lying to standing. I opened my eyes and was back in bed, but still unable to move. I closed my eyes again, and felt the change in perceptions, but still couldn't see so I felt my surroundings and determined I was standing next to my bed. In my bedroom there's a door that opens to a balcony that is right next to my bed. I felt for the door handle, got my hand on it and opened it. I stepped outside and felt a rush of warm air and the sun shining on my skin; strange since in reality it was the middle of winter. I reached out for the railing and when I touched it I felt the heat from metal that has been sitting in the sun. I could hear kids playing on the street below me; I took a deep breath of fresh air and opened my eyes hoping to see this summer scene, but when I did I was back in bed.

I then started opening and closing my eyes rapidly and each time I did I felt the change in perceptions. It was like being in two different realties. In one I could do everything but see, in the other I could see but do nothing else. Eventually when I closed my eyes there was no change, and then it wasn't long before the sleep paralysis wore off and I could move again. It wasn't like waking up again as in a false awakening; I just could move again in the one reality. I got out of bed, looked out the window, and was disappointed to see it was snowing.

I don't really know what to make of the whole thing.
Wow! It sounds like you were switching between your astral body and your physical body, like switching channels. Wow!
 
S

Sciborg_S_Patel

#12
Read this over the weekend in the Kindle collection Exploring the Edge Realms of Consciousness:

Into the Green Underworld (Part 1 of 2)

Into the Green Underworld (Part 2 of 2)

It's an account of traveling to the reality of spirits that utilize marijuana as a means to drain humans of willpower. Seems kinda preachy to me despite the fact that I don't partake of marijuana, but the narrative is an interesting one and it perhaps does suggest caution in over-use of any drug.

If nothing else makes for a good read:

So now we get to their creation story! According to the historian, this plant was made as an agreement between the crystalline beings and the plant beings in a time before humans had dishonored the plant kingdom.

The Historian continues:

"There used to be great honor and respect between the humans and the people of the leaf, I will not go too far into how degraded this relationship has become, but know that now our people still serve the purposes of the leaf and of the Earth."

"Your minds* (Translates as emotions thought-forms and will) by contrast, are now polluted with a thick foggy stench of illusions and vices born out of vanity. This pollution is choking us even here as well as many other sacred beings throughout the three worlds. We used to work more openly with your people, but all that has changed with your abuse of fire."

Then, as if reading my thoughts, the story changes as I wonder about their motives.....
 
#13
I too find that there are mixed results in remembering my dreams. I'm hoping that over the long term, with continued diligence in recording them, that recall will become more consistent. I think also that some nights, depending on how your sleep was, the dreams may be more vivid or memorable.
Chuck,

I did some dream recall work a ways back. I got a book from the Edgar Cayce folks, I believe Thurston was the author. Anyhow, with the help of the suggestions/techniques in that book, I went from maybe 1-3 dreams a month, to 2-3 a night. They have a dream symbol dictionary to help interpret possible meanings, as well. Was even able to have a few that seemed genuinely psychic. Definitely saw patterns over time in the dream journal I kept, which also definitely seemed to help with recall. It does get easier!

That said, life got busy, stopped the journal, sleep patterns got more variable, now I'm back to 2-3 a month :(

I'd like to try the lucid dreaming book I got next, but it's still gathering dust for now
 
C

chuck.drake

#14
Chuck,

I did some dream recall work a ways back. I got a book from the Edgar Cayce folks, I believe Thurston was the author. Anyhow, with the help of the suggestions/techniques in that book, I went from maybe 1-3 dreams a month, to 2-3 a night. They have a dream symbol dictionary to help interpret possible meanings, as well. Was even able to have a few that seemed genuinely psychic. Definitely saw patterns over time in the dream journal I kept, which also definitely seemed to help with recall. It does get easier!

That said, life got busy, stopped the journal, sleep patterns got more variable, now I'm back to 2-3 a month :(

I'd like to try the lucid dreaming book I got next, but it's still gathering dust for now
I think it is a real commitment to gain any kind of mastery. Some folks seem to have a kind of natural facility for it, but for the rest I think it requires real dedication and the willingness to improve across multiple disciplines seemingly unrelated to lucid dreaming, like concentration, mindfulness, visualization and memory. But for me it seems a worthwhile challenge.
 
#15
I think it is a real commitment to gain any kind of mastery. Some folks seem to have a kind of natural facility for it, but for the rest I think it requires real dedication and the willingness to improve across multiple disciplines seemingly unrelated to lucid dreaming, like concentration, mindfulness, visualization and memory. But for me it seems a worthwhile challenge.
It definitely required a commitment from me - took several months to get some of the techniques down and achieve regular recall. Once stopped, I lost the skill considerably quicker than I gained it, that's for sure.

Good luck, it can definitely be interesting and fun!
 
#16
I think it is a real commitment to gain any kind of mastery. Some folks seem to have a kind of natural facility for it, but for the rest I think it requires real dedication and the willingness to improve across multiple disciplines seemingly unrelated to lucid dreaming, like concentration, mindfulness, visualization and memory. But for me it seems a worthwhile challenge.
For me, I was able to become lucid with very little effort. Even now all I have to do is tell myself I'll be aware that I'm dreaming when I'm in bed.

What took a lot of effort for me was learning how to control the dream. It took awhile, and I'm always learning, but the process was interesting and very fun.
 
C

chuck.drake

#17
For me, I was able to become lucid with very little effort. Even now all I have to do is tell myself I'll be aware that I'm dreaming when I'm in bed.

What took a lot of effort for me was learning how to control the dream. It took awhile, and I'm always learning, but the process was interesting and very fun.
You are lucky. If you are inclined at all toward Buddhism, you should check this book out:

http://www.amazon.com/Tibetan-Yogas...=1398808553&sr=8-1&keywords=tenzin+dream+yoga
 
S

Sciborg_S_Patel

#18
Lucid Dreaming and Parallel Universes: An Interview with Fred Alan Wolf

The reason I was thinking about going home was the bizarre physiognomy I was suddenly gifted with. I merely had to look at the face, any face, and I "saw." More than seeing, I knew. The facts of the personality were an open book to me. I merely looked at a face and it would undergo a series of transformations, each change revealing a new fact. I couldn't look too closely because, frankly, I was frightened by what I saw. On every face was great sadness and pain. The faces were normal when looked at quickly, but when examined for any length of time they became grotesque masks with great striations of contorted pain lines, hideous peelings of unfolding skin layers, and throbbing nerve threads all pulsating on raw skin.

Suddenly I realized where I was and announced to myself, i.e., thought to myself, I was on the astral plane of suicides. These people had committed suicide on earth and were waiting to reincarnate - to return to earth and be reborn. But there was a slight problem. In order for them to return they had to be acceptable to all the "normal" nonsuicidal souls they will share a body with. That is why they were here: to await humanity's decision.

Each of us is a universe of souls, not just a single soul journeying from here to Timbuktu. As the Buddha taught, we are all questions of compromise. Each of us is a universe of past lives, and some of us living now owe a debt of gratitude to the others for allowing us to live again. These suicides were the astral-level component, the parallel-universe level of reality, of past failures in life. We all have in us the lives of past failures, murderers, rapists, saints and sinners.
Lucy: In your book The Dreaming Universe you have a chapter entitled "Lucid Dreams: The Borderland Between Parallel Realities". Would you talk a bit about your theories of lucid dreaming and how they relate to parallel universes?

Dr. Wolf: The question that I was working on at the time - and this was some years ago, it is more than ten years ago; my thoughts may have changed by now -- was how can we grasp how a person feels or reaches a feeling - an experience - which says "I am I", "I am me", "I am this", "I am myself" and has that experience of what they refer to as "I"? That was the question that was the seed from which The Dreaming Universe book really grew.

Because that was the question, the whole development of the book was finding ways of looking at the answer and what I was getting to, was in the lucid dream state - if I remember correctly - was the notion that our brains are able to act like receiving instruments and are able to pick up and perceive not only just the reality that we think we're in - so called "this world" - but other alternative realities at the same time. In other words, in a kind of schizophrenic state.

So the idea was "What's the difference between my experience of the "out there world" and the so-called lucid dream?" Now, the outstanding experience of a lucid dream is that I am aware that I have an I. Whereas, in an ordinary dream I have no such awareness. As the dream unfolds I don't seem to have any control over how it unfolds and I certainly don't have any recognition of myself as experiencing myself as in a dream. But in a lucid dream I know I'm dreaming, I know I'm in a dream, and I know the world is a world which is a parallel reality to the world that I normally experience when I'm awake. So, the notion of parallel realities just sort of appeared kind of naturally.
 
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Sciborg_S_Patel

#19
Guest post on Prescott's blog: Visiting the astral plane

Matt Rouge's guest post inspired another longtime reader to offer his thoughts. Cyrus Kirkpatrick, who's already put out an impressive number of books (see his Amazon author page) offers an excerpt from a forthcoming book with the working title Life After Death For Skeptics. He calls this story "my personal validation of the topics commonly discussed here on MP’s blog."
 
#20
Guest post on Prescott's blog: Visiting the astral plane

Matt Rouge's guest post inspired another longtime reader to offer his thoughts. Cyrus Kirkpatrick, who's already put out an impressive number of books (see his Amazon author page) offers an excerpt from a forthcoming book with the working title Life After Death For Skeptics. He calls this story "my personal validation of the topics commonly discussed here on MP’s blog."
Just got round to reading that blog post. I found it interesting in that it wasn't so fantastically weird that I could not relate to it. On the contrary, it seemed sufficiently mundane (as these things go) to maybe inspire me to restart my own attempts at such things - something I haven't done in a very long time.
 
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