Mod+ Bending Spoons and the Limits of Intellectual Tolerance

#1
http://www.thinkanomalous.com/blog/bending-spoons-and-the-limits-of-intellectual-tolerance

A few weeks ago, the CARE Program for Integrated Health and Healing at the University of Alberta posted a notice about an upcoming spoon-bending workshop on campus. Participants (mostly doctors, but other community members were invited as well) would be guided through a meditation that would enable them to warp a spoon with the power of their minds - and a certain amount of pressure from their hands. The event was the concluding presentation in a series exploring integrative medicine as a complement to conventional health care, and it was intended to be a fun activity to end on.(1)

The would-be presenter, Anastasia Kutt, an energy-healing therapist in Edmonton, Alberta (Western Canada), was prepared for a skeptical audience and hoping for an “educated conversation.”

She was immediately disappointed.

An outcry from skeptical tweeters pressured CARE’s director into cancelling the workshop and spurred Kutt’s resignation from the program. Meanwhile, the media amplified debunkers’ scorn in an over-blown and one-sided treatment of the controversy.

The #spoongate controversy demonstrates the narrow limits of our tolerance for unorthodox views in the modern university system, and offers a warning on the intellectually-stifling effects of suppressing discussion for appearances’ sake. It also raises questions about the role of academic institutions in regulating thought and practice, and implores us to take a more committed stance on intellectual freedom in the university.
As Kutt remarked, “the “skeptics” criticize many of these therapies for having no evidence, but when they are being explored in a university setting, they are bullied out.” Is spoon bending a real phenomenon? Can it be scrutinized by science? We’ll never know if we continue to drive its proponents from centres of learning, shutting down research and debate before they’ve even begun.

Tolerating advocacy for a particular position is not the same thing as advocating for that position, and censoring dissent is not the same thing as reaching consensus. We have nothing to fear from extending the limits of intellectual tolerance to include a discussion of what some might consider pseudoscientific practices.

The spoon-bending workshop should have proceeded as planned. Who knows, maybe some doctors would have bent their spoons. Maybe they would not have. Either way, we’d have learned something about the power of the mind.
 

Brian_the_bard

Lost Pilgrim
Member
#2
I don't see what people have to fear from just looking at the evidence. If it can't happen then it's not going to happen and if it does happen - hey we've discovered something new! If it goes against your worldview then you just adapt your worldview.
 

Brian_the_bard

Lost Pilgrim
Member
#4
Synchronistically, I watched a video only yesterday of Dr Dean Radin in which he played a video of part of The Matrix where the child tells Neo that trying to bend the spoon is impossible but instead, he should realise the truth - there is no spoon!
 
#6
I'm skeptical of Telekinesis, first its spoons and keys, then what Cars and Planes? Maybe I don't understand the foundation of it well, but it would scary me if someone had those type of powers
 
#7
I'm skeptical of Telekinesis, first its spoons and keys, then what Cars and Planes? Maybe I don't understand the foundation of it well, but it would scary me if someone had those type of powers
I think it's a phenomenon needing to be seen to be believed perhaps. I'm not sure even those claiming to be able to do it necessarily know how it works for sure, or its limits.
 
Last edited:
#10
For more on spoon bending see:
http://www.skeptiko-forum.com/threads/spoon-bending.360/

"Spoon bending" is a short form slang for one type of macro-pk - a variety of metal objects is frequently used.

" narrow limits of our tolerance for unorthodox views in the modern university system, and offers a warning on the intellectually-stifling effects of suppressing discussion for appearances’ sake." - this should concern more of us, but it won't.
 
Top