Brain wave measured 10 mins past death

#3
What happens to the body and mind after death remains almost entirely mysterious to scientists. Two other studies last year, for instance, demonstrated that genes appeared to continue functioning – and even function more energetically – in the days after people die.
For some reason - I find this even more surprising.
 
#5
Biological death? Clinical Death? I'm no expert, but there are instances of resuscitation after periods much longer than ten minutes, occasionally even hours later - given the right circumstances (usually cold temperatures). Trying to define death becomes increasingly difficult. Even one of the modern favourites, 'Brain Death' may not necessarily be clearly defined in all cases, or if it is defined, sooner or later along comes a patient to break the rules.
 
#6
Only one of the four people studied exhibited the long-lasting and mysterious brain activity, with activity in most patients dying off before their heart stopped beating. But all of their brains behaved different in the minutes after they died – adding further mystery to what happens to them after death.
Maybe his soul were reluctant to pass on and tried to "jump-start" his dead body by "merging" with it - just like many NDE'ers experience when they are "sucked back" into their body and wakes up. Worst scenario though would be that he is in some form of persisting suspended animation there. Imagine the horror!?!
 
#7
Trying to define death becomes increasingly difficult.
That is true.

I taught Advance Cardiac Life Support to medical professionals for many years. The consensus seems to be that, under normal circumstances, so much brain tissue has died from hypoxia after about 10 minutes that resuscitation efforts are useless.
 
#8
Maybe his soul were reluctant to pass on and tried to "jump-start" his dead body by "merging" with it - just like many NDE'ers experience when they are "sucked back" into their body and wakes up. Worst scenario though would be that he is in some form of persisting suspended animation there. Imagine the horror!?!
Suspended animation ....as in hanging around the body ?
 
#9
That is true.

I taught Advance Cardiac Life Support to medical professionals for many years. The consensus seems to be that, under normal circumstances, so much brain tissue has died from hypoxia after about 10 minutes that resuscitation efforts are useless.
Apparently that's not correct anymore. It certainly used to be though. Sadly the majority of medical facilities are just not up to date with this new technology. This article is more than three years old and it's ridiculous that this technology is not available to everyone.

http://theweek.com/articles/464406/how-australian-hospital-bringing-clinically-dead-people-back-life

The Auto Pulse Machine and (ECMO) extracorporeal membrane oxygenation have been used to treat seven patients so far.

The treatments allow doctors to figure out the cause of the heart attack, treat it, and maintain blood and oxygen flow. This decreases the risk for permanent disability. All three patients that were revived returned home without disability.

While in the ambulance, Fielder was offered a choice between two hospitals.

"For some reason, I said The Alfred, which is pretty lucky because they are the only one that has it," he said.
.......................................
Quite bizarre, when you think about it, bit like asking the patient, which do you prefer to do, live or die ?
 
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#10
Suspended animation ....as in hanging around the body ?
Yeah, but without being able to move or communicate. It's not that likely though since they had thorough monitoring of heart and breathing. But it could be a state of a prolonged death process where the mind is present and aware of the dying process with all the anxiety that comes with it. Imagine existing like this for, lets say; 5-10 minutes. That would be the most horrific experience one can imagine - I imagine.

This thing with prolonged death process was something discussed after the French Revolution, where the executioner, using a guillotine, almost all the time noted that the face, mouth, and eyes were moving on the beheaded victims.for quite some time after the execution. One incident with a women was described like this;
An expression of "unequivocal indignation" was shown on the face of the decapitated Charlotte Corday when her cheek was slapped by one executioner.
Another report from a doctor told this;
The following report was written by Dr. Beaurieux, who experimented with the head of a condemned prisoner by the name of Henri Languille, on 28 June 1905:

Here, then, is what I was able to note immediately after the decapitation: the eyelids and lips of the guillotined man worked in irregularly rhythmic contractions for about five or six seconds. This phenomenon has been remarked by all those finding themselves in the same conditions as myself for observing what happens after the severing of the neck ...

I waited for several seconds. The spasmodic movements ceased. It was then that I called in a strong, sharp voice: "Languille!" I saw the eyelids slowly lift up, without any spasmodic contractions – I insist advisedly on this peculiarity – but with an even movement, quite distinct and normal, such as happens in everyday life, with people awakened or torn from their thoughts.

Next Languille's eyes very definitely fixed themselves on mine and the pupils focused themselves. I was not, then, dealing with the sort of vague dull look without any expression, that can be observed any day in dying people to whom one speaks: I was dealing with undeniably living eyes which were looking at me. After several seconds, the eyelids closed again

It was at that point that I called out again and, once more, without any spasm, slowly, the eyelids lifted and undeniably living eyes fixed themselves on mine with perhaps even more penetration than the first time. Then there was a further closing of the eyelids, but now less complete. I attempted the effect of a third call; there was no further movement – and the eyes took on the glazed look which they have in the dead. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guillotine#Living_heads
So, who knows how long we might linger in the body during the death process.
 
#11
Apparently that's not correct anymore. It certainly used to be though. Sadly the majority of medical facilities are just not up to date with this new technology. This article is more than three years old and it's ridiculous that this technology is not available to everyone.
Thanks Tim, I was going to say something similar - but in much less detail. One other point, regarding damage to brain cells. Parnia has said that the biggest risk for damage to the brain is in the period after resuscitation, how the patient is treated during the following 72 hours (I think) can be the most important for whether or not the patient recovers fully with no impairment of brain function.
 
#12
Yeah, but without being able to move or communicate. It's not that likely though since they had thorough monitoring of heart and breathing. But it could be a state of a prolonged death process where the mind is present and aware of the dying process with all the anxiety that comes with it. Imagine existing like this for, lets say; 5-10 minutes. That would be the most horrific experience one can imagine - I imagine.

This thing with prolonged death process was something discussed after the French Revolution, where the executioner, using a guillotine, almost all the time noted that the face, mouth, and eyes were moving on the beheaded victims.for quite some time after the execution. One incident with a women was described like this; Another report from a doctor told this; So, who knows how long we might linger in the body during the death process.
This happened to my friend Ray. He told me what came to his mind at the time of his multiple cardiac arrests, that he felt like Prometheus waiting for the pain, in this case, of the shocks (the pain on re-entering his body).
 
#13
Thanks Tim, I was going to say something similar - but in much less detail. One other point, regarding damage to brain cells. Parnia has said that the biggest risk for damage to the brain is in the period after resuscitation, how the patient is treated during the following 72 hours (I think) can be the most important for whether or not the patient recovers fully with no impairment of brain function.
Yes, I believe so, Typoz. I thought administering as much oxygen to a patient as possible would have been a good thing but they've discovered that it can be toxic in many people and actually destroy the brain cells.
 
#14
Yeah, but without being able to move or communicate. It's not that likely though since they had thorough monitoring of heart and breathing. But it could be a state of a prolonged death process where the mind is present and aware of the dying process with all the anxiety that comes with it. Imagine existing like this for, lets say; 5-10 minutes. That would be the most horrific experience one can imagine - I imagine.

This thing with prolonged death process was something discussed after the French Revolution, where the executioner, using a guillotine, almost all the time noted that the face, mouth, and eyes were moving on the beheaded victims.for quite some time after the execution. One incident with a women was described like this; Another report from a doctor told this; So, who knows how long we might linger in the body during the death process.
I agree that this is very interesting, and I've sometimes rather morbidly contemplated what it would be like to be beheaded (I've no wish to find out).

On the other hand, maybe we just have very simplified ideas of death, and might be missing something. I recall one NDE account (on youtube) where someone had a parachute failure and was plunging rapidly towards the ground. However, at a certain height, I don't remember whether it was 100 feet or more, the person separated from their body and remained hovering at that height, and watched the body continue to fall and hit the ground below. The impact wasn't felt or experienced, just observed from a distance. (The badly-injured body survived the impact and the person later recovered after major treatment in hospital).

There are similar recollections in some past-life regressions, where a person recalls their own death in an earlier lifetime, but does not always experience the actual death from within the body.

I'm not sure what to make of all this, but to me it seems like we should not simply assume that we and our body are the same.
 
#16
I agree that this is very interesting, and I've sometimes rather morbidly contemplated what it would be like to be beheaded (I've no wish to find out).

On the other hand, maybe we just have very simplified ideas of death, and might be missing something. I recall one NDE account (on youtube) where someone had a parachute failure and was plunging rapidly towards the ground. However, at a certain height, I don't remember whether it was 100 feet or more, the person separated from their body and remained hovering at that height, and watched the body continue to fall and hit the ground below. The impact wasn't felt or experienced, just observed from a distance. (The badly-injured body survived the impact and the person later recovered after major treatment in hospital).

There are similar recollections in some past-life regressions, where a person recalls their own death in an earlier lifetime, but does not always experience the actual death from within the body.

I'm not sure what to make of all this, but to me it seems like we should not simply assume that we and our body are the same.
Yes she (her report) was very interesting just as you've outlined. She answered a few questions I had too. She was falling to earth with her bundle of twisted up parachute above her panicking and then she stopped panicking (as I recall) because she felt she was about to meet her creator. Then "she" came to a stop just as you said, 100-200 feet off the ground and she saw her body carry on downwards and "buy the farm" as they call it (hit the deck) but she felt nothing of this impact. She saw her body hit the ground and then bounce up (heard the reverb) and bounce a second time before going down from her position up in the air (OBE) to inspect it, looking at her own face etc.
 
#17
This happened to my friend Ray. He told me what came to his mind at the time of his multiple cardiac arrests, that he felt like Prometheus waiting for the pain, in this case, of the shocks (the pain on re-entering his body).
Yeah, many NDE'ers says that the re-entry to their body is rather painful - especially if they have had an accident of course. But even other NDE'ers says that the heaviness and the pain just about every person have in their body (I'm talking about normal aches, like, bad back, knees, ligament, muscles, etc), aches that they considered tolerable and manageable before, now hits them with a great impact, compared to the total weightlessness and totally pain-free experience they felt in their NDE.
 
#18
Yeah, many NDE'ers says that the re-entry to their body is rather painful - especially if they have had an accident of course. But even other NDE'ers says that the heaviness and the pain just about every person have in their body (I'm talking about normal aches, like, bad back, knees, ligament, muscles, etc), aches that they considered tolerable and manageable before, now hits them with a great impact, compared to the total weightlessness and totally pain-free experience they felt in their NDE.
Having many OBE's under my belt now I can confirm that it can be quite excruciating, but I know that they are pains I filter out which would be considered quite minute because any thought that generates stress causes terrible pain during the exit stage and the re-enter stage is like being electrocuted sometimes.
 
#19
I agree that this is very interesting, and I've sometimes rather morbidly contemplated what it would be like to be beheaded (I've no wish to find out).

On the other hand, maybe we just have very simplified ideas of death, and might be missing something. I recall one NDE account (on youtube) where someone had a parachute failure and was plunging rapidly towards the ground. However, at a certain height, I don't remember whether it was 100 feet or more, the person separated from their body and remained hovering at that height, and watched the body continue to fall and hit the ground below. The impact wasn't felt or experienced, just observed from a distance. (The badly-injured body survived the impact and the person later recovered after major treatment in hospital).

There are similar recollections in some past-life regressions, where a person recalls their own death in an earlier lifetime, but does not always experience the actual death from within the body.

I'm not sure what to make of all this, but to me it seems like we should not simply assume that we and our body are the same.
Yeah, there seems to exist some form of "opt-out" mechanism for some people, that makes them alleviated from traumatic/painful situations, and literally step out of their bodies. I read about one case of a man who was about to drown. He was swimming for his life while he got sucked out to sea by some strong current. And while he still was swimming, with real strong fear for his life, he had an OBE and saw himself (his body) still swimming below him from an elevated viewpoint and felt totally detached from his body. He had some initial feelings of an NDE, before he suddenly was back in his body.
 
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