Cell Intelligence reborn

#1
As some of you will have noticed, my thread about cell intelligence suffered in the recent crash.

However, Perandre has found the thread on some sort of a caching site - part of GOOGLE - so I'll put back by original post here, and perhaps others can do the same. The old thread can be found by going to the end of the old Cell Intelligence thread and looking at Perandre's post. My original post follows:

Just before the big crash, someone (sorry I forget who (possibly Vault or Max-B) - can he/she identify themselves!) posted this interesting link about the work by Guenter Albrecht-Buehler on the intelligence of cells.

http://www.basic.northwestern.edu/g-buehler/FRAME.HTM

It would appear that this work has been largely ignored, probably because it poses some serious challenges to the prevailing paradigm that intelligence is a property of networks on neurons.

I'd like people to read it and then we can discuss it more meaningfully.

David
 
#2
Yes it was me, I did compose a long reply, but the forum problems killed it... couldn't be bothered to write it again, so this is the condensed version...

Albrecht-Buehler's work is certainly worthwhile reading. You can see Koonce was making similar suggestions regarding the relationship between cell motility and the centriole. More recent work also indicates additional functions for the centriole. Because of the motility issues involved, it's also worthwhile taking a look at neuronal migration in the formation of the cortex, good recent video here.
 
#3
I also think I wrote somewhere... that we would have to consider as a minimum, electromagnetic effects on cell organization and behavior, in addition to electro-chemical effects.

Then in response to Paul's links, I think I linked to this latest short review paper by Cifra, on Non-chemical and non-contact cell-to-cell communication:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3786266/pdf/ajtr0005-0586.pdf

When I find time, I must download the papers he references and read them for myself. However Cifra's summaries of these studies seem pretty interesting - from a brief look.
 
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