coherent interference

#1
Playing around this morning, thought I would post a quick and simplistic diagram as to the best way I find to think about much of the strange stuff that we discuss on here...

The best way I've found to think about these things is to consider that matching relative space-like and time-like separations (patterns) allow additive/subtractive (coherence) processing to take place outside of space-time.

That is that the same relative patterns allow coherent interference with one another, and get summed to a space-time location. Processed to a result that has a particular spatial through to temporal perspective.

 
S

Sciborg_S_Patel

#2
On #5 - are you suggesting causation across a temporal gap?

Or do you mean the influence of the past is through the patterns?
 
#6
OK, remembering my diagram, and also my belief that the stronger the emotion and feeling related to an experience, the more coherence it must have gained with matching patterns over space-time, so the wider the unique pattern spread out through space-time, and thus the wider the experience spread out - in this case - through time.


In effect, you catch a piece of somebody else's unique experience which is out of place in time.
 
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#7
#8

Classic hospitalised NDE OBE. Shows patients network being temporarily entrained by third party firing, as patients own endogenous EM field loses power. Patients network responds to the more powerful compatible third party firing, just as if it were it's own neurons firing. Patient has an experience, but not necessarily from the patients own senses. Sense of 'self' is located at the most logical position to deal with combined sensory data.
 
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#9
OK, remembering my diagram, and also my belief that the stronger the emotion and feeling related to an experience, the more coherence it must have gained with matching patterns over space-time, so the wider the unique pattern spread out through space-time, and thus the wider the experience spread out - in this case - through time.


In effect, you catch a piece of somebody else's unique experience which is out of place in time.
My doc wanted me to go for a colonoscopy earlier in this year... he wanted to look at the whole of my large bowel... which I wasn't too sure about. Anyway, I did a bit of research first, and discovered that they would be giving me Midazolam (Versed) for the proceedure. So I did a bit of research on Midazolam, and wasn't happy with what I found. Midazolam affects memory, allowing you to be treated whilst conscious, but with apparent loss of explicit memory recall from the period Midazolam is administered. This allows hospitals to undertake quicker procedures (that might be painful), and get you out the door, without needing a longer stay in hospital. Although the Colonoscopy leaflet I got stated I must have a close friend collect me from hospital, and they must stay with me overnight. I could not be left on my own because of my memory impairment.

The marketing blurb on the internet says Midazolam causes a loss of ability to create new memories - so, if you were in pain during a medical procedure... you won't remember it... well, thats the claim anyway. But because of all my research on consciousness and memory, my alarm bells started ringing. So I dug a little deeper. I found papers which showed post-traumatic-stress-disorder (PTSD) symptoms in children who had previously been admitted to hospital and had Midazolam administered to them. I also found many anecdotal stories on medical forums, posted by patients who had been administered Midazolam, in which they claimed they had experienced PTSD like effects, nightmares, and mental health problems. To cut a long story short, I told my doc no. I didn't want anyone mucking about with my brain, as it's unclear how memory works, or how Midazolam works on memory.

However, during my research, I came across a number of papers studying the memory effects of Midazolam, which showed a strange, and significant *strengthening* of memory recall, the opposite of the effect Midazolam is supposed to produce. But this memory strengthening was for the recall of a subjects experiences, just prior to the administration of Midazolam. This effect is quite difficult to understand, but I agree with some of the studies authors, who suggest that something like 'Interference Theory' is the best way to try and reconcile these observations.

Basically this theory suggests that memories interfere with each other (although I'd rather say that past experiences interfere with present experiences, and dump the 'memory' label altogether). To understand the Midazolam strengthened memory studies... it's suggested that Midazolam stops memory formation. It's this lack of memory formation during the period that Midazolam is administered, that allows subjects recollections prior to midazolam's administration, to show better recall post-midazolam administration. Because during the period that the Midazolam is administered, there is a period of reduced interference.

Therefore we could perhaps say that memories (past experiences) can cross time to the present, more effectively than normal, if there is reduced interference (reduced experiences) within the intervening period of time.

In the last couple of weeks I've made a new connection between my ideas (further above), and these Midazolam studies.

As some of your will know, I suggest that the brain is a spatial pattern of matter (spatial network), that we would understand as merely storing access to your past experiences, and the associations between them. Very simplistically, you might think of your brains network a bit like a slowly changing fingerprint (plasticity), that allows you to access your past experiences, where they match patterns of activation on your current fingerprint.

It's difficult to see why (in terms of physical matter), a roman road (above) is made of anything different to your physical brain. And considering that we all interact very precisely in this shared reality (nature), it's difficult to say that a spatial pattern in the external world, say a roman road (as above) that we all 'appear' to perceive and share objectively, can be any different to a spatial pattern in your brain (a spatial pattern of network activation).

So if Midazolam is thought to produce a period of reduced memory interference, which allows a persons pre-administration experiences to cross time, with improved recall. Then it appears that in the case of Harry Martindale's roman ghost experience in the cellar of Treasurers House, we can perhaps propose a similar explanation...

The covering over of the roman road (a spatial pattern of matter) with dirt, which was also over-built by a structure, produced a long period of reduced experiences, that are correlated with the spatial pattern of matter of the roman road. This would produce a period of reduced interference associated with the roman road. When the roman road was excavated hundreds of years later by York University, the long period of reduced interference, potentially allowed past experiences associated with the roman road to cross time, with improved recall. Just like Midazolam, but rather than the strengthening effect being between 'your' past patterns and 'your' present patterns. This effect would be between someone elses past patterns, and your present patterns. And the reason that this matching can occur, is because of the 'sharing' of the pattern of the roman road.

This is the most plausible reason to me, why building works are so often associated with classic repetitive-type hauntings... these building works often uncover past spatial patterns of matter, that have had a period of reduced interference from experiences associated with them.

Anyway, I thought it was pretty interesting that I could show a similarity between Midazolam's effects, and my ideas to explain repetitive type hauntings (Harry Martindale's above). I can now show other matching effects (but from different perspectives between observers in space-time), but I'll leave it like that for now.

I've probably baffled everybody with my writing... it makes sense to me... but it's probably incoherent... Lol.
 
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#11
The covering over of the roman road (a spatial pattern of matter) with dirt, which was also over-built by a structure, produced a long period of reduced experiences, that are correlated with the spatial pattern of matter of the roman road. This would produce a period of reduced interference associated with the roman road. When the roman road was excavated hundreds of years later by York University, the long period of reduced interference, potentially allowed past experiences associated with the roman road to cross time, with improved recall. Just like Midazolam, but rather than the strengthening effect being between 'your' past patterns and 'your' present patterns. This effect would be between someone elses past patterns, and your present patterns. And the reason that this matching can occur, is because of the 'sharing' of the pattern of the roman road.

This is the most plausible reason to me, why building works are so often associated with classic repetitive-type hauntings... these building works often uncover past spatial patterns of matter, that have had a period of reduced interference from experiences associated with them.

Anyway, I thought it was pretty interesting that I could show a similarity between Midazolam's effects, and my ideas to explain repetitive type hauntings (Harry Martindale's above). I can now show other matching effects (but from different perspectives between observers in space-time), but I'll leave it like that for now.

I've probably baffled everybody with my writing... it makes sense to me... but it's probably incoherent... Lol.
Yeah, as much as I would like to grasp what you are getting at, I'm unable to do so. The universe is filled with "spacial patterns of matter", so when you speak of a roman road being covered by dirt and other structures, then uncovered at a later point in time, I don't understand exactly how these physical structures were blocking/reducing the interference patterns of the emotional content of the event that occurred there. What was blocking what? What exactly is able to propagate through space and time now that the dirt was removed? How would you relate this to someone being able to accurately remote view/perceive objects hundreds of miles away through buildings, steel, concrete structures, etc? And how is it that the strong emotional content of a traumatic death may lead to a corresponding birth deformity years later (as in Stevenson/Tucker reincarnation cases) in which the same brains aren't even involved? While I can vaguely imaging what you describe as having an impact in certain situations I can't imagine it being explanatory for the wide range of "paranormal" phenomena that's been described.

Cheers,
Bill
 
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#12
Yeah, as much as I would like to grasp what what you are getting at, I'm unable to do so. The universe is filled with "spacial patterns of matter", so when you speak of a roman road being covered by dirt and other structures, then uncovered at a later point in time, I don't understand exactly how these physical structures were blocking/reducing the interference patterns of the emotional content of the event that occurred there. What was blocking what? What exactly is able to propagate through space and time now that the dirt was removed? How would you relate this to someone being able to accurately remote view/perceive objects hundreds of miles away through buildings, steel, concrete structures, etc? And how is it that the strong emotional content of a traumatic death may lead to a corresponding birth deformity years later (as in Stevenson/Tucker reincarnation cases) in which the same brains aren't even involved? While I can vaguely imaging what you describe as having an impact in certain situations I can't imagine it being explanatory for the wide range of "paranormal" phenomena that's been described.
There's a lot there... so I'll try one thing at a time... Did you get the Midazolam idea?
 
#14
There's a lot there... so I'll try one thing at a time... Did you get the Midazolam idea?
I can conceptually understand this part:

But this memory strengthening was for the recall of a subjects experiences, just prior to the administration of Midazolam. This effect is quite difficult to understand, but I agree with some of the studies authors, who suggest that something like 'Interference Theory' is the best way to try and reconcile these observations.
Cheers,
Bill
 
#16
Max,

I think it is well worth reading the book, "Self Doesn't Die", discussed at length here:
http://www.skeptiko-forum.com/threads/new-book-self-doesnt-die.3413/
Quite a few of these cases involve circumstances where the brain was definitely not firing - one man had an extensive NDE while his body was in a morgue fridge! Several examples involved people who had been 'dead' for many minutes. The thing that surprises me, is just how long someone can be 'dead' and still be capable of a full recovery.

David
 
#17
Max,

I think it is well worth reading the book, "Self Doesn't Die", discussed at length here:
http://www.skeptiko-forum.com/threads/new-book-self-doesnt-die.3413/
Quite a few of these cases involve circumstances where the brain was definitely not firing - one man had an extensive NDE while his body was in a morgue fridge! Several examples involved people who had been 'dead' for many minutes. The thing that surprises me, is just how long someone can be 'dead' and still be capable of a full recovery.

David
I've read it.
 
#18
Well my point is that surely some of those accounts relate to situations in which the brain won't have any active neural networks? I mean you have accounts that involve very protracted periods of resuscitation, and sometimes periods in which absolutely nothing was being done - there would not be any blood flow in the brain. I mean, without employing some of the very dubious sceptical arguments to get round that evidence, doesn't that blow your argument out of the water?

David
 
#19
Well my point is that surely some of those accounts relate to situations in which the brain won't have any active neural networks? I mean you have accounts that involve very protracted periods of resuscitation, and sometimes periods in which absolutely nothing was being done - there would not be any blood flow in the brain. I mean, without employing some of the very dubious sceptical arguments to get round that evidence, doesn't that blow your argument out of the water?

David
The simple answer is, no, not at all.
 
#20
doesn't that blow your argument out of the water?
Max has had examples of OBE's where there is no one else around (falsifying his theory) but he rejects any evidence that contradicts his theory. Understandable I suppose, he has put a lot of work into his ideas, I'll give him that.
 
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