Gordon White, Pieces of Eight: Part 1, Christianity’s Shadow |332|

I think most serious scholars hold some kind of middle ground position. i.e. the Jesus of the Bible is not historical, but not a total myth either. but the mythicists have some strong points... and even psydo-mythicists like Bart Ehrman are pretty widely accepted.
Thanks, Alex. I asked the question and that's all I really wanted to do.
 
agreed. I'll add Neem Karoli Baba as another great mystic that talks about a physical Jesus.
Thanks for the tip on this guy, I was unfamiliar with him. It would be really interesting to compile of list of guys like this and see what they kind of all had to say? How many? Are they consistent with each other? Etc?

I'm open to the mystery here, but that has to include all the craziness that is Christianity... it's messy :)
Speaking of crazy, this made me think of some of the things Steiner and Cayce said. Steiner points out how the significant part (or, almost all) of the story in the Bible starts when Jesus hits 30 and is baptized by John. Steiner's claim is the dove that came down during the Baptism was symbolism for the Christ Spirit (Christ Consciousness?) that entered the body of the man named Jesus at that specific point in time. Cayce says (and I believe Steiner too) that the individual named Jesus actually went through many incarnations (under different names) with the mission to perfect the constitution of the body/soul to such an extent that it would be able to handle the Christ Spirit in the incarnation of the one named Jesus. Cayce has a book that I believe tells the story of these incarnations. Steiner also has a book called From Jesus To Christ, where he talks about this, although I can't recall if he specifically mentions the prior incarnations of Jesus, by name. There is also significant mention of Jesus around age 12 in the Bible, which Steiner also attempts to explain the meaning in, but can't remember what he said there. Actually, don't quote me on any of this, going off memory, but it's all something along these lines. Steiner also wrote a book called the Fifth Gospel - the idea being, it's a gospel, or additional details on Jesus not mentioned in the Bible, all coming straight from the Akashic Records!

Point being, for somebody who subscribes to the typical, traditional Christian narrative, this would all be absolute insanity, lol.
 
Thanks for the tip on this guy, I was unfamiliar with him. It would be really interesting to compile of list of guys like this and see what they kind of all had to say? How many? Are they consistent with each other? Etc?



Speaking of crazy, this made me think of some of the things Steiner and Cayce said. Steiner points out how the significant part (or, almost all) of the story in the Bible starts when Jesus hits 30 and is baptized by John. Steiner's claim is the dove that came down during the Baptism was symbolism for the Christ Spirit (Christ Consciousness?) that entered the body of the man named Jesus at that specific point in time. Cayce says (and I believe Steiner too) that the individual named Jesus actually went through many incarnations (under different names) with the mission to perfect the constitution of the body/soul to such an extent that it would be able to handle the Christ Spirit in the incarnation of the one named Jesus. Cayce has a book that I believe tells the story of these incarnations. Steiner also has a book called From Jesus To Christ, where he talks about this, although I can't recall if he specifically mentions the prior incarnations of Jesus, by name. There is also significant mention of Jesus around age 12 in the Bible, which Steiner also attempts to explain the meaning in, but can't remember what he said there. Actually, don't quote me on any of this, going off memory, but it's all something along these lines. Steiner also wrote a book called the Fifth Gospel - the idea being, it's a gospel, or additional details on Jesus not mentioned in the Bible, all coming straight from the Akashic Records!

Point being, for somebody who subscribes to the typical, traditional Christian narrative, this would all be absolute insanity, lol.
yeah, there does seem to be this weird double standard thing when folks reinterpret Bible stories. Stuff that would otherwise be considered way over-the-top are given consideration.
 
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