I have been seeing a lot more religious themed NDE stories. what do you guys think?

#1
One thing that I wonder sometimes may be neglected or possibly underreported is more religious type of NDE experiences. I sometimes think of it in similar ways to the distressing NDE experiences. If I remember correctly, I think something like 1 in 5 or 1 in 10 (I know that would prove huge statistical differences, but I cannot remember the exact ratio that I recently heard) may experience distressing NDE's. I think I found that number either in Jan Holden's book of Near Death Experiences or maybe it was Nan Bush's Dancing Past the Dark. But either way, I often visit a site that has over 80 pages of NDE related videos. They sometimes have videos relating to religious type experiences in NDE's and if there is a link to the video, I will sometimes check out the website. I came across one recently called heavenvisit.com and wanted to hear some other people's takes on it.

Do you think there are a lot more religious type NDE's that occur but go underreported for various reasons, or is it possible that because NDE's, in a way, have become so popularized, that various people are attempting to "cash in" on these experiences..whether motivated for financial reasons, or to push a certain agenda (or religious belief).

A lot of the experiences on that website, perhaps all, I have only checked out a few, seem to push the traditional Christian beliefs of heaven, hell, salvation, Jesus as Savior, etc.

It is difficult to judge the authenticity of some of these accounts, but I do not want to simply discount them because they run counter to many of the more traditional NDE type experiences, of love, peace, acceptance and oneness.

Some of the more well known examples may be Ian McCormick, Howard Storm or Donald Piper, but lately I have been coming across a lot more of these type of reported NDE experiences.

What do you guys think??
 
#3
However, some religious NDEs are obviously sincere. Read for example Dr George Ritchie's book length account of his experience. That has to be the ultimate "Jesus NDE" if ever there was one. It's an odd experience reading that one now, over 70 years later...
 
#4
I'm more than willing to bet that at least some of them qualify as "cashing in". I'd argue most of those who go and write books about their experiences are more likely to be cashing in. If someone has had a religion-themed NDE that you have to do a bit of prying to find out about, that one, in my opinion, is more likely to have some truth to it.
 
#5
I'm more than willing to bet that at least some of them qualify as "cashing in". I'd argue most of those who go and write books about their experiences are more likely to be cashing in. If someone has had a religion-themed NDE that you have to do a bit of prying to find out about, that one, in my opinion, is more likely to have some truth to it.
I do think cases that are being used for fame and profit by the reported experiencer are for that reason fundamentally much more suspect. I've also noticed that cases which are written up into books are far more likely to contain more showy gimmicks like prophecies of world events (often inaccurate ones, at that). The cases researchers gather through seeking out and interviewing experiencers should be considered the most reliable.
 
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