Lucid dreams

Brian_the_bard

Lost Pilgrim
Member
#1
I am interested in hearing about dreams people have had where they knew they were dreaming and were able to control the dream to some degree.

I have had a number of dreams where for a brief second I knew I was dreaming but I drifted back into normal dreaming before I could gain control. These usually ended in flying dreams. A few months ago, however, I dreamt I was in an old house that I hadn't been in before and I was walking up some steps into an attic room. Near the top of the steps I suddenly realised that I was dreaming. I continued into the room and saw a tall mirror standing on a chair and I became curious about whether you can see your reflection in a dream. I looked and I did see my reflection but it was different. I looked like I had a mask on with no features. I walked away from the mirror towards a window and that is the last thing I could remember.
 

Brian_the_bard

Lost Pilgrim
Member
#3
I have had about 120 lucid dreams.

I can tell more about my dreams next week. I'm visiting some relatives this weekend and I hate typing with my laptop keyboard.
I look forward to reading about them. :)

I remembered a couple of times when I nearly entered the Lucid dream state from the hypnogogic state. The first time I appeared to be standing on a school playing field but I panicked and woke up. The second time, I found myself on top of a hill looking at an immense, luminous, billowing cloud in intense detail. That one felt amazing but I didn't quite get into dreaming sadly.

My wife had one recently where she realized that her parents were talking a lot of gibberish and she shouted at them, "this is all gibberish; what kind of dream is this!?" When she realized she was dreaming, her first thought was "I'll have to tell Brian about this when I wake up."
 
#4
Funny you should bring this up, because I took a nap yesterday, which always seems to be more conducive to lucid dreaming, and I had one.

After I woke up I checked Skeptiko and saw your post!

Though I have had many lucid dreams, I have never been able to control them when I become lucid. When I was younger, I had an issue with becoming lucid because my dream characters would start attacking me, as though was I was not allowed to realize I was dreaming.

I would also have an issue with multiple false awakenings that were unpleasant.

At this stage, because of that, when I become lucid, I immediately try to find a way to awaken myself.

So yesterday, I had a dream wherein I became lucid, and I “woke up” into another dream where I thought I had awakened, but it was still a dream. I went to look for something on my book shelf, but the book shelf was not there. I realized this didn’t make sense, and I then realized I was in a dream.

At the time, in real life, my husband was playing guitar in the hallway, and my bedroom door was open while I napped.

After I realized the book shelf wasn’t there and realized I was in a dream, I started talking to my “husband.” I told him we were trapped in a dream and he needed to help me wake up. I told him to pick me up or shake me. He tried to pick me up, but he said I was too heavy! I said, how can that be? I don’t even exist!

Then I heard the the faint sound of guitar music from the hallway, and I remembered the circumstances of why I was napping. So I said to my “dream husband” that I can hear him playing guitar in real life, in the hallway. Dream Husband seemed to take that in stride, and then I realized he didn’t have a beard. (My husband grew a beard about two months ago.)

Since I couldn’t wake up, I said to Dream Husband, who seemed cool with being a dream character, that I wanted to walk around the house because I have dreamed about this house many times before. (That is true.)

So I took him on a tour of the house, telling him how I remember it now, that I have dreamed of it many times before.

Then my son barged into the room asking if we had juice in the house. He scared me awake by doing that, and I woke up for real. My husband was still playing guitar in the hallway.

I told husband about the dream and how weird it was to be talking to him in a dream and simultaneously hearing him play music in real life. A weird feeling.

But at least I didn’t have to go through multiple false awakenings. I really, really hate that.

I have had two positive lucid dreams in my life, but most became nightmarish when I became lucid. These days they seem neutral, except the hell of false awakenings.
 

Brian_the_bard

Lost Pilgrim
Member
#5
That's amazing Doppelgänger. There was a lot of detail in that dream. Thank you for sharing.

I would also have an issue with multiple false awakenings that were unpleasant.
I had a false awakening once but the dream wasn't lucid. It was when I was a teenager, still living with my parents. I dreamt I was being chased by a group of teenagers on the green opposite our house. I panicked and "woke up" but I didn't know that I hadn't really woken up. The room was exactly the same as it was in real life and I felt relieved that I had only been dreaming. Just then I saw shadows of three people walking about on the porch outside my window and I got really scared and woke up for real. I don't ever want to experience that again!
 
#6
I find it odd that false awakenings are described as unpleasant. Occasionally I've had benign or neutral such experiences, while one of them was profoundly uplifting. The odd thing on that occasion was that the innermost level was the most real - and it was wrapped in an ordinary mundane dream. But for me these were not specifically 'lucid dreams' in that the dream was only recognised with hindsight.
 
#9
Though I have had many lucid dreams, I have never been able to control them when I become lucid.
I have found that it is easy to have very long lucid dreams if I touch things. Sometimes i pick up some object like a soda can and hold it in my hands, or I lick the floor etc. In most of my lucid dreams I'm at home or in some other house which feels familiar. Although many of my lucid dreams are very long, they are actually quite boring. In those dreams I usually try to convert them into OBEs. Sometimes I wake up and sometimes I'm just stuck in the dream. In those situations I try to think what I should do next and usually I just break windows, mirrors and furniture. Everything feels very real. If I punch door or wall with my fists it feels exactly the same as in real life.

Once I have managed to achieve vibrational state through dream conversion. Unfortunately i was too afraid to leave my body. I have also experienced some other vibrational state related phenomena after lucid dreams. I have experienced sense of movement and energy, and I have also had sleep paralysis a few times. At one time after a dream I realized that I didn't have a body at all. I was a ball of energy. I bounced on the floor on my "face" but then I got stuck on the floor. Then I woke up.

I have identified my most common dream signals:
I see myself in the mirror and I see that I have long hair (I'm completely bald in real life).
If I try to switch on the light, the light switch doesn't work.
Computers and other electronic devices don't function properly.
I see weird letters and numbers on my cellphone screen, or time goes backwards etc.
A swarm of flies. (This is very unpleasant. I have a phobia of flies.)
I'm outside in my underwear, or I carry a blanket or pillow.

Sometimes in a lucid dream I realize that I don't have to fear anything. Once I saw some scary demonic faces in the mirror. I knew that nothing could hurt me in a dream, so I went to the mirror and pressed my face on it. I looked at those faces and I found their attempts to scare me amusing.

In two lucid dreams I have received guidance. I don't know if I was guided by my own subconscious or some helper etc. In the first dream I tried to enter some house through a window. I thought that I could kill the people inside, because this is merely a dream and nobody will get hurt in real life. Some kind of force prevented me from entering the house and then I heard a voice tell me that I have to remove all violent thoughts. Only then I can enter. I thought calm and friendly thoughts and then I could enter. Inside the house was a small child and I had a feeling that I must protect him. In another dream I saw a swarm of flies. It disturbed my attempts to convert a dream into OBE. Then I heard a voice that said I must be calm and ignore the flies. Suddenly I was in a different environment and I saw the swarm of flies again. Then the voice repeated its message. I tried dream conversion again but then I woke up.

I have had a few lucid dreams that may have actually been astral projections. Year ago I had a stomach flu. It was hard to sleep because my stomach ached and I felt nauseous. Suddenly I realized that I was in dream. Then I noticed that I felt great. No aches or nausea. I felt extremely good and happy. I can still remember clearly what the environment looked like. I walked on a corridor that had no walls. There were only pillars. After that corridor I came outside. It was a light and warm summer evening. Grass was very green and quite tall. On a distance I saw a barn, a field and spruce forest. On my right there was a large black metal door. I floated through it and then I woke up. I felt terrible again.

Once I have had a spontaneous OBE. It was a very short experience, but it proved to me that OBEs are not lucid dreams.
 
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Brian_the_bard

Lost Pilgrim
Member
#10
That's amazing Raimo, I wish I had them as frequently as you. What did you experience when you had sleep paralysis?

Once I have had a spontaneous OBE. It was a very short experience, but it proved to me that OBEs are not lucid dreams.
I had a spontaneous OBE once. I woke up and I could feel my arms supporting my head as is usual when I lie on my front, but when I "opened my eyes" I found myself floating along a country lane looking down at a woman who I imagined had an early start at work. It was dark, but when I looked at some distant trees, they appeared to be in daylight. Suddenly I got scared and woke up. I still keep trying to rationalize the experience but it was too real to be just a dream!
 
#11
That's amazing Doppelgänger. There was a lot of detail in that dream. Thank you for sharing.


I had a false awakening once but the dream wasn't lucid. It was when I was a teenager, still living with my parents. I dreamt I was being chased by a group of teenagers on the green opposite our house. I panicked and "woke up" but I didn't know that I hadn't really woken up. The room was exactly the same as it was in real life and I felt relieved that I had only been dreaming. Just then I saw shadows of three people walking about on the porch outside my window and I got really scared and woke up for real. I don't ever want to experience that again!
Thanks, Brian. I realize what I wrote was a bit rambling, but I literally had just had it and felt compelled to write it down. Perhaps Skeptiko was not the best place for that! I do know that hearing others' dreams can be really, really boring, lol. :)

When I was younger, though, I did keep a meticulous dream journal, but in later life with so many responsibilities, it is difficult to do that.

Thanks for listening.
 
#12
I find it odd that false awakenings are described as unpleasant. Occasionally I've had benign or neutral such experiences, while one of them was profoundly uplifting. The odd thing on that occasion was that the innermost level was the most real - and it was wrapped in an ordinary mundane dream. But for me these were not specifically 'lucid dreams' in that the dream was only recognised with hindsight.
Well, for me why I hate false awakenings is that I suffered from nightmares wherein I’d become lucid. Becoming lucid only made the dream worse. As I mentioned above, my dream characters would immediately start attacking me, usually in very nasty and upsetting ways.

I would try to escape the dream, then have a false awakening. Once again, the dream would turn nightmarish and I’d realize I was still in the dream. I would try to move my body, but I am paralyzed, of course. I would try to open my eyes, but they would only sort of open. I could barely see my bedroom surroundings before my eyes seemed to be forced shut.

I remember a particular dream where I was so desperate to wake up, I decided to run out a window. I remember it so well because right before I smashed through the window to hit the ground, I thought, “What if I’m wrong?”
 
#13
I have identified my most common dream signals:

If I try to switch on the light, the light switch doesn't work.
Computers and other electronic devices don't function properly.
A swarm of flies. (This is very unpleasant. I have a phobia of flies.
I quoted the above that used to work for me. Definitely the light switch and to a lesser degree, electronics. But instead of a swarm of flies, it is bees. I have a phobia of bees. I've actually never been stung by one, but I have been stung three times by wasps as a child, so that phobia extended to bees.
 
#14
Well, for me why I hate false awakenings is that I suffered from nightmares wherein I’d become lucid. Becoming lucid only made the dream worse. As I mentioned above, my dream characters would immediately start attacking me, usually in very nasty and upsetting ways.
I do find people's personal experiences very interesting, thanks for sharing. I do understand that against the background of nightmarish experience, false awakenings would certainly not be a pleasant situation to find oneself in.

I think maybe I was thinking of things in a broader context, where especially in the media, unusual experiences are often presented as scary. For example, the movie 'Red Lights' starts off considering some of the topics we often debate on these forums, but ends up in a terrifying way. Then, at least on UK television, the series "The Ghost Inside My Child" about children who remember past lives is presented with the tag lines "scary", "hiding behind the sofa" and so on. It often seems that ghosts automatically must be considered frightening. There are lots of movies which include some form of paranormal content, and it seems that most of these turn it into something to be afraid of.

My own feeling is that this is on the whole a misrepresentation. There certainly are some frightening occurrences, but I don't feel that should be the default position on these matters.
 
#15
What did you experience when you had sleep paralysis?
I couldn't move and I saw only blackness. I didn't have any scary hallucinations. The experiences were frightening, but they weren't entirely unpleasant. In one instance I heard some noises and thought that someone is approaching. Then I thought that some other resident of this apartment house will take care of that noise and I don't have to worry about that. After that thought I could relax and after a while I could move my body.
 
#16
Well, I've had a lot of experience with this stuff. I'll share some of the things that come to mind.

My first experience with sleep paralysis, I awoke from an unpleasent dream and found I couldn't move. My body was so tense, like I was straining every part of me. I could move my eyes, but couldn't cry out. I saw, at the foot of the bed, a large, looming shadow, with two flouresent green eyes. Paired with the helplessness, the visual was terrifying. I fought to move while staring right at the shadow. Eventually, I shot up into a sitting position, as if I were pushing against a weight on my chest and the weight suddenly disappeared. Now face to face with the shadow, it began to recede into the background darkness, the eyes getting smaller and farther away, before fading entirely.

I then had a strange experiences where I awoke in my bed and was unable to move. Unlike the first time, there was no terror. Strangely, when I struggled to get up, I actually moved, but it was with monumental effort (though the effort was never tiring). It felt like pulling from giant elastic band with my body. After getting a small distance away from my starting point, I instantly snapped back, and my head was back on the pillow and I still couldn't move properly. Again, I tried to get up, the same monumental effort to move, but this time I made it farther before snapping back again. I tried a few more times, making it even farther, almost getting to my door, but always snapping back again. After the last time, the paralysis faded, and I stood up with no issue.

And here is an experience I posted a couple of years ago:

I awoke in my bed with the sun shining through the curtains; but I could not move any part of my body except my eyes, I wasn't frightened as I've been through sleep paralysis a number of times. What made this experience so strange was that when I closed my eyes my perceptions immediately changed; I could no longer feel the pillow on the side of my face or the sheets on my body. My eyes were still closed and I couldn't see. I knew I was no longer lying down, but standing up. Picture lying down and then standing up with your eyes remaining closed. That was the feeling, but it was instant from lying to standing. I opened my eyes and was back in bed, but still unable to move. I closed my eyes again, and felt the change in perceptions, but still couldn't see so I felt my surroundings and determined I was standing next to my bed. In my bedroom there's a door that opens to a balcony that is right next to my bed. I felt for the door handle, got my hand on it and opened it. I stepped outside and felt a rush of warm air and the sun shining on my skin; strange since in reality it was the middle of winter. I reached out for the railing and when I touched it I felt the heat from metal that has been sitting in the sun. I could hear kids playing on the street below me; I took a deep breath of fresh air and opened my eyes hoping to see this summer scene, but when I did I was back in bed.

I then started opening and closing my eyes rapidly and each time I did I felt the change in perceptions. It was like being in two different realities. In one I could do everything but see, in the other I could see but do nothing else. Eventually when I closed my eyes there was no change, and then it wasn't long before the sleep paralysis wore off and I could move again. It wasn't like waking up again as in a false awakening; I just could move again in the one reality. I got out of bed, looked out the window, and was disappointed to see it was snowing.
 
#17
Well, for me why I hate false awakenings is that I suffered from nightmares wherein I’d become lucid. Becoming lucid only made the dream worse. As I mentioned above, my dream characters would immediately start attacking me, usually in very nasty and upsetting ways.

I would try to escape the dream, then have a false awakening. Once again, the dream would turn nightmarish and I’d realize I was still in the dream. I would try to move my body, but I am paralyzed, of course. I would try to open my eyes, but they would only sort of open. I could barely see my bedroom surroundings before my eyes seemed to be forced shut.

I remember a particular dream where I was so desperate to wake up, I decided to run out a window. I remember it so well because right before I smashed through the window to hit the ground, I thought, “What if I’m wrong?”
I only recall one dream with false awakenings, and I was about age 10 or so I think when it happened. With each false awakening I would roll over and look at the wall and think that I was awake but the wall would be like a sheet flowing in the breeze on a clothesline and so I knew I was still asleep. About 12 times I rolled over to look at the wall, and finally I woke up and looked at the wall and it was really the wall and not a sheet, so I got out of bed and inspected it to make sure it was solid and I was no longer asleep. Very mundane dream but also a little unsettling to be stuck and not really be able wake up so the experience really stuck with me all these years.

At the moment all of my dreams are completely mundane stressful replays of whatever project I've just been working on (remodeling the house) except everything is going wrong and I'm screwing it up or injuring myself and wake myself up kicking the bed and saying "shit!" "dammit!" "I cut that board in the wrong place!" "I smudged the paint!" "I sawed my fingers off!" "I splashed acid on my legs!" "I got dirt and doghair in the epoxy countertop!" "A big glob of stucco fell off my trowel and splattered the light fixture!" etc...

46 more days and I can get back to having entertaining dreams again. :)

But on topic with the lucid dreams... I have had them on rare occasions and they are always fun. Last one I had, I jumped out of a plane with no parachute and as I was falling through the clouds I realized I could make the landscape change at will and so I realized I was dreaming and could relax and enjoy falling through the sky. I then changed the ground into an airstrip and landed (somehow) and there was a group of people standing around in old dirty clothes kind of like there were hardships of war.. and there was a military presence and a line of people. And then I looked around found my fiancee in line and I tried to change the surrounding environment a little too forcefully and so I woke up.
 
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Brian_the_bard

Lost Pilgrim
Member
#18
Thanks, Brian. I realize what I wrote was a bit rambling, but I literally had just had it and felt compelled to write it down. Perhaps Skeptiko was not the best place for that! I do know that hearing others' dreams can be really, really boring, lol. :).
Not at all - that was really interesting!

When I was younger, though, I did keep a meticulous dream journal, but in later life with so many responsibilities, it is difficult to do that..
Me too. I had a book called "Lucid Dreaming in 30 Days" and keeping a dream journal was part of the technique.
 
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