New Study: Brain Activity At The Moment of Death

#1
Any comments on this new study and what it means for NDE research?? This is from Neuroskeptic.

Brain Activity At The Moment of Death
By Neuroskeptic | March 3, 2017 2:48 pm

What happens in the brain when we die?


Canadian researchers Loretta Norton and colleagues of the University of Western Ontario examine this grave question in a new paper: Electroencephalographic Recordings During Withdrawal of Life-Sustaining Therapy Until 30 Minutes After Declaration of Death

Norton et al. examined frontal EEG recordings from four critically ill patients at the point where their life support was withdrawn. Here are some details on the four:



Here’s the EEG recordings. None of the patients met criteria for brain death at baseline. Time 0 represents the moment of clinical death, namely when arterial blood pressure (ABP) became constant, indicating that the heart had stopped. This occured a few minutes after life support had been withdrawn.

Norton et al. note that for three of the four patients, EEG activity ceased before the heart stopped beating – up to 10 minutes before, in the case of patient #2. However, patient #4 showed a slightly different pattern, with electrical activity (delta wave bursts) occuring up to 10 minutes after the final heartbeat.

The authors say that it’s hard to explain these apparently post-mortem delta waves:

It is difficult to posit a physiological basis for this EEG activity given that it occurs after a prolonged loss of circulation. These waveform bursts could, therefore, be artefactual in nature, although an artefactual source could not be identified.

Another interesting finding was that the actual moment at which the heart stopped was not associated with any abrupt change in the EEG. The authors found no evidence of the large “delta blip” (the so-called “death wave“), an electrical phenomena which has been observed in rats following decapitation.

Overall, this paper is an interesting contribution to the small field of necroneuroscience (see also), although the small sample size and the fact that all of these patients were severely ill, and on heavy sedative medications, makes it hard to know how far the findings will generalize.

http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/n...in-activity-at-the-moment-of-death/#more-8593
 
#2
Any comments on this new study and what it means for NDE research?? This is from Neuroskeptic.

Brain Activity At The Moment of Death
By Neuroskeptic | March 3, 2017 2:48 pm

What happens in the brain when we die?


Canadian researchers Loretta Norton and colleagues of the University of Western Ontario examine this grave question in a new paper: Electroencephalographic Recordings During Withdrawal of Life-Sustaining Therapy Until 30 Minutes After Declaration of Death

Norton et al. examined frontal EEG recordings from four critically ill patients at the point where their life support was withdrawn. Here are some details on the four:



Here’s the EEG recordings. None of the patients met criteria for brain death at baseline. Time 0 represents the moment of clinical death, namely when arterial blood pressure (ABP) became constant, indicating that the heart had stopped. This occured a few minutes after life support had been withdrawn.

Norton et al. note that for three of the four patients, EEG activity ceased before the heart stopped beating – up to 10 minutes before, in the case of patient #2. However, patient #4 showed a slightly different pattern, with electrical activity (delta wave bursts) occuring up to 10 minutes after the final heartbeat.

The authors say that it’s hard to explain these apparently post-mortem delta waves:

It is difficult to posit a physiological basis for this EEG activity given that it occurs after a prolonged loss of circulation. These waveform bursts could, therefore, be artefactual in nature, although an artefactual source could not be identified.

Another interesting finding was that the actual moment at which the heart stopped was not associated with any abrupt change in the EEG. The authors found no evidence of the large “delta blip” (the so-called “death wave“), an electrical phenomena which has been observed in rats following decapitation.

Overall, this paper is an interesting contribution to the small field of necroneuroscience (see also), although the small sample size and the fact that all of these patients were severely ill, and on heavy sedative medications, makes it hard to know how far the findings will generalize.

http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/n...in-activity-at-the-moment-of-death/#more-8593
Borjigin's study linked in the article above is incorrectly described as having used decapitation of rodents, it didn't. It also used invasive EEG (iEEG), which this study didn't.

IIRC, ( my memory is very hazy on this), Penny Sartori mentioned at the end of one of her books, her anger at finding out a relative (her father?) had been given a drug at the end of their life, expressly against her instructions, and which she believed would have interfered with his ability to have an NDE.

I haven't read the paper. Would be great to know what, and when drugs were given, and the set up around each patient, people present, distance from patient, for the period of the EEG recordings.

Definitely more research needed into the dying process... it's just that there's little money in it. Seeing such artefacts on EEG recordings after death within her rodents, was what motivated her to undertake a very detailed study as to what was going on.

But it seems reasonably likely to me, that humans would respond similarly to the rodents in her study, under the same circumstances.
 
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