No God in The Machine

#44
On the one hand, you seem to be suggesting that undocumented stories are too unreliable to tell us much about psi, yet on the other hand you seem to be suggesting that we are ok to depend upon unreliable stories as a source of information about cognitive bias and memory. Interesting.
The way it works is like this--our accuracy is 100 percent unreliable whenever it pertains to psi. We simply can't get anything right. Yet, when we are completely unconscious or in a coma (like Pam Reynolds, the denture guy, the guy noticing the yellow sticky notes on the monitor.....) our barely functioning senses give us many accurate details about our surroundings and environment.

Cheers,
Bill
 
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Sciborg_S_Patel

#48
The way it works is like this--our accuracy is 100 percent unreliable whenever it pertains to psi. We simply can't get anything right. Yet, when we are completely unconscious or in a coma (like Pam Reynolds, the denture guy, the guy noticing the yellow sticky notes on the monitor.....) our barely functioning senses give us many accurate details about our surroundings and environment.

Cheers,
Bill
I was thinking about this as well in the context of NDEs. People have used the argument of speed/quality/degree of processing to explain consciousness in computational terms, and as such it seems odd to then have people say a tiny flicker of electricity can produce incredibly subjective experience.

It's not a definitive counterargument against materialistic explanation but it is odd to see the distance between the two assertions laid side by side.
 
#50
I was thinking about this as well in the context of NDEs. People have used the argument of speed/quality/degree of processing to explain consciousness in computational terms, and as such it seems odd to then have people say a tiny flicker of electricity can produce incredibly subjective experience.

It's not a definitive counterargument against materialistic explanation but it is odd to see the distance between the two assertions laid side by side.
Indeed. As Bernardo once wrote, "This is akin to claiming that if you damage every component of a car, except for, say, the spark plugs, the car can drive even faster than when everything is working in perfect order!"

I'm the Bernardo quote master. Nobody can touch me.
 
#51
What percent accurate?

Cheers,
Bill
No, how would knowing that feedback alters recall in 80% of the trials in a study help you when evaluating the effects of feedback on a set of undocumented stories (which also would be a highly selected, rather than representative, sample)?

Linda
 
#52
No, how would knowing that feedback alters recall in 80% of the trials in a study help you when evaluating the effects of feedback on a set of undocumented stories (which also would be a highly selected, rather than representative, sample)?

Linda
So the accuracy is 20 percent?

Cheers,
Bill
 
#53
The way it works is like this--our accuracy is 100 percent unreliable whenever it pertains to psi. We simply can't get anything right. Yet, when we are completely unconscious or in a coma (like Pam Reynolds, the denture guy, the guy noticing the yellow sticky notes on the monitor.....) our barely functioning senses give us many accurate details about our surroundings and environment.

Cheers,
Bill
Hmmm.... One might almost wonder when exactly that "memory" was formed?
 
#58
I was thinking about this as well in the context of NDEs. People have used the argument of speed/quality/degree of processing to explain consciousness in computational terms, and as such it seems odd to then have people say a tiny flicker of electricity can produce incredibly subjective experience.

It's not a definitive counterargument against materialistic explanation but it is odd to see the distance between the two assertions laid side by side.
Particularly so when the impoverished or non-functioning brain during the NDE is able to bring about not only the fullest, richest experience, but also on occasions give access to all knowledge and understanding. At the very least it might seem to suggest that the relationship of mind and brain in some ways is an inverse one, where the less the brain function, the better the mind works.

Perhaps the idea of using powerful computers to generate consciousness is heading in the wrong direction. Rather than adding circuits, perhaps they should be taken away.
 
#59
Particularly so when the impoverished or non-functioning brain during the NDE is able to bring about not only the fullest, richest experience, but also on occasions give access to all knowledge and understanding. At the very least it might seem to suggest that the relationship of mind and brain in some ways is an inverse one, where the less the brain function, the better the mind works.

Perhaps the idea of using powerful computers to generate consciousness is heading in the wrong direction. Rather than adding circuits, perhaps they should be taken away.
Hey, Typoz is in da house!
 
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