Nobel Winning Physicist's Support for Psi [Resources]

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Sciborg_S_Patel

#2
Biological Utilisation of Quantum NonLocality

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The explanation proposed here involves the issue of exactly what kind of randomness is being presupposed when one performs such statistical averaging. An answer to this question in general terms is provided by causal (non-statistical) models of the phenomena of the quantum realm such as that of Bohm(9). This kind of interpretation assumes the relevance of particular probability distributions in an appropriate phase space. The possibility that one needs in general to deal with coexisting multiple representations of reality (complementarity) is then considered, the implication being that different kinds of probability distributions to those relevant to quantum mechanical predictions may be appropriate in cases such as those involving biosystems.

From the point of view of a biosystem itself, this possibility translates into one that biosystems can have more discriminative knowledge of nature than is obtainable by quantum measurement. As a result of this higher degree of discrimination, the evolutionary and developmental processes characteristic of biosystems can, given suitable initial conditions, lead to focussed probability distributions that make possible the kind of human abilities (i.e. psi functioning) to which reference has been previously made..."
 
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Sciborg_S_Patel

#3
THE PARANORMAL: THE EVIDENCE AND ITS IMPLICATIONS FOR CONSCIOUSNESS by Jessica Utts and Brian D. Josephson

This idea perhaps makes sense in the light of theories that presuppose that quantum theory is not the ultimate theory of nature, but involves (in ways that in some versions of the idea can be made mathematically precise) the manifestations of a deeper "subquantum domain". In just the same way that a surf rider can make use of random waves to travel effortlessly along, a psychic may be able to direct random energy at the subquantum level for her own purposes. Some accounts of the subquantum level involve action at a distance, which fits in well with some purported psychic abilities.

These proposals are extremely speculative. What needs to be done, in any event, is to integrate mental phenomena more thoroughly into the framework of science (including the quantum level) than is presently the case. The research of Lawrence LeShan (as described in his book The Medium, the Mystic and the Physicist), where interviews with psychics disclosed that they were aware of a "hierarchy of meaningful interconnections", perhaps provides a hint of what might be involved. Science has a poor handle on ideas such as meaningful interconnections since they are alien to its usual ways of thinking. Perhaps it will need to overcome its current abhorrence of such concepts in order to arrive at the truth.
 
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Sciborg_S_Patel

#4
Pioneer of the Paranormal

The Nobel-prize-winning physicist Brian Josephson has studied the brain and the paranormal for 30 years. He tells Edwin Cartlidge that most physicists have an irrational prejudice against unorthodox areas of research.

Josephson is best known for his pioneering theoretical work on superconductivity, which led to the invention of the Josephson junction and earned him a share of the 1973 Nobel Prize for Physics. Josephson junctions are the key components in superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs). which are widely used to make extremely sensitive measurements of magnetic fields. But these days, Josephson is the director of the "Mind-matter unification project" at the Cavendish. He spends his time thinking about how the brain works, investigating topics such as language and consciousness, and pondering the fundamental connections between music and the mind. Most controversially, as far as physicists are concerned, he carries out speculative research on the nature of paranormal phenomena, a field known as parapsychology.


Beyond quantum theoryJosephson's current work is based on the belief that quantum mechanics is not the ultimate theory of nature. "Future science will consider quantum mechanics as the phenomenology of particular kinds of organised complex system," he says. "Quantum entanglement would be one manifestation of such organisation, paranormal phenomena another. As yet, our understanding of such matters is very qualitative, but application of the skills of the physicist to such situations can be expected to yield more precise theories in due course."
"The trouble is that the scientific community is not aware of these results because very little of this work is published in journals like Nature and Science," says Josephson. And the work is often ridiculed when it is published in respectable physics journals. He cites the example of a paper on quantum mechanics by Henry Stapp of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory that contained a reference to parapsychology. Although this paper was published in Physical Review A in 1994, it was subsequently criticized in the letters pages of Physics Today. Josephson believes that the landmark 1935 paper by Einstein, Podolsky and Rosen setting out a hypothetical thought experiment in quantum mechanics was just as conjectural as Stapp's paper.

"Physicists have an emotional response when they hear anything connected with parapsychology," he says. "Their opinion of parapsychology research is not based on evaluation of the evidence but on a dogmatic belief that all research in this field is false."

Josephson believes the same is true of other unorthodox areas of research, such as cold fusion or homeopathy. The scientific community, he maintains, has been highly influenced by the views of the chemist Irving Langmuir, who argued that phenomena which are difficult to reproduce are not real. On the contrary, says Josephson, phenomena may legitimately be difficult to reproduce, such as those associated with neutrinos.
 
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Sciborg_S_Patel

#5
Biological Observer-Participation and Wheeler's 'Law without Law'

In Wheeler’s article the gap between acts of observer-participancy and physical reality was not filled in, an insufficiency that we attribute to the absence of an appropriate theory of observation. In the following we discuss a biologically oriented scheme where observation plays a central role, and show how it can lead to the emergence of physical laws. The structure of this scheme can be summarised as primordial reality → circular mechanics → semiotics and structure → technological development → regulatory mechanisms → emergent laws.

Here ‘circular mechanics’ is a reference to a generic scheme of biological organisation proposed by Yardley[3], encompassing among its aspects sign processes in accord with the semiosis concepts of Peirce[4], which in turn underlie processes of a technological character, among which we hypothesise are the capacity to form systems such as our universe, to which laws of a mathematical kind are applicable. In this way, we are able to link life, viewed from a generic point of view, to the origin of universes.
 
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Sciborg_S_Patel

#7
The Real M-Theory

The official video of the lecture given by Brian Josephson at the 2012 Nobel Laureates' meeting at Lindau.

Beyond the Standard Model we find uncertainty and confusion, with both unclarity as to which might be the correct theory, as well as little in the way of connections between theory and experiment. But, even in less exotic contexts, issues such as non-locality and entanglement, and the role of the observer, point to the existence of something not, as yet, clearly understood. The missing factor, it will be suggested, is the process of 'observer-participancy', or more simply agency, that Wheeler [1] hypothesised might '[suffice] to build everything'.

Wheeler's hypothesis was an intuitive leap based on the idea that an elementary quantum observation to some degree imposes a corresponding form on reality but this, from the present perspective, misses the point. Minds more generally impose form on reality, suggesting (cf. Stapp [2]) that in quantum observation we see some kind of mind at work. It is then logical to suggest that whereas mind or agency is involved in processes such as particle detection in some limited form, a less limited form might be involved in more dramatic manifestations of reality, such as our universe.

Wheeler did not make such a suggestion explicitly, though he may well have had it in his mind. It was wise for him to use unemotional terminology such as observer-participancy, rather than some term such as agency which might arouse 'attack dogs' (as has happened to those who have proposed this kind of ideas using terms such as agency or intelligence [3]). But to rule out ideas a priori is unscientific.

What was missing from Wheeler's analysis was a clear understanding of what is involved in being a subject. This belongs more to the field of study known as cognitive science, from which it follows that cognitive models represent the direction from which Wheeler's ideas should be approached in order to develop them further. Networks that evolve to optimise their collective functioning, including especially the development of inter-system cooperation, appear to have a crucial role to play. We hypothesise that 'the real M-theory' involves networks functioning as minds, with both quantum mechanics and space-time geometry emerging as the behaviour of systems of this kind in particular situations, rather than being fundamental. Models based on such principles should reveal the extent to which such a picture is valid.
 
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Sciborg_S_Patel

#8
Limitations and Pathology in the Scientific Process

Science addresses itself to only a part of reality, focussing on that part which can be fitted to some fixed description. The creative aspect of reality, that which adapts itself to circumstances, is equally important even if it is not amenable to investigations that presume a fixed description. To neglect, or dismiss, knowledge that does not fit this narrow concept of knowledge, is to foster an imbalanced perspective, with likely detrimental consequences to society. Related to the above is the phenomenon of Pathological Disbelief, a situation where strong evidence in favour of a claim is very generally ignored, though a process of entrenched consensus. Promising developments such as cold fusion were blocked by the mainstream journals, leading to widespread ignorance of the supportive evidence. Again, the physics preprint archive arxiv.org, set up initially as a means of fostering the communication of new ideas, morphed, through the actions of moderators possessed of limited vision, into a mechanism for frustrating such communication,. It is essential that science admit, and appropriately address, its limitations, and express openness to new ways of thinking.
 
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Sciborg_S_Patel

#9
LIMITS TO THE UNIVERSALITY OF QUANTUM MECHANICS

Niels Bohr's arguments indicating the non-applicability of quantum methodology to the study of the ultimate details of life given in his book "Atomic physics and human knowledge" conflict with the commonly held opposite view. The bases for the usual beliefs are examined and shown to have little validity. Significant differences do exist between the living organism and the type of system studied successfully in the physics laboratory. Dealing with living organisms in quantum-mechanical terms with the same degree of rigour as is normal for non-living systems would seem not to be possible without considering also questions of the origins of life and of the universe.
 
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Sciborg_S_Patel

#10
Brian Josephson on Creative Mind and Physical Reality:


Traditionally in science, specific physical laws are the basis for understanding all phenomena. Wheeler however argued (in an article entitled Law Without Law) that the laws of physics are the consequence of the action of minds (observers) themselves. As will be discussed, proper development of this idea requires consideration of mechanisms of cognitive development. This kind of picture offers the possibility of explanations for certain phenomena, such as the origin of life, and the very specific details of musical compositions, that are hard to understand on the basis of conventional thinking.
Some extrapolations - by which I mean wild guesses (;)) - along these lines here.
 
#12
We don't really understand quantum entanglements. We can't see them and they're hard to detect. We have no idea if there are conditions under which they could be tough and resillient enough to dislodge from the particles they're attached to, and float away. Honestly, it looks like quantum entanglement is good for psi, good for ghosts and good for other spooky things. Dark matter is also good for paranormal phenomena. Maybe these grey aliens are actually dark matter lifeforms. Our current understanding of physics fits much more closely with paranormal stuff than it does the MWI interpretation of QM and time travel. Gee wiz, I think MWI and time travel should be considered woo and the paranormal is just in the process of accumulating enough evidence.
 
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Sciborg_S_Patel

#13
We don't really understand quantum entanglements. We can't see them and they're hard to detect. We have no idea if there are conditions under which they could be tough and resillient enough to dislodge from the particles they're attached to, and float away. Honestly, it looks like quantum entanglement is good for psi, good for ghosts and good for other spooky things. Dark matter is also good for paranormal phenomena. Maybe these grey aliens are actually dark matter lifeforms. Our current understanding of physics fits much more closely with paranormal stuff than it does the MWI interpretation of QM and time travel. Gee wiz, I think MWI and time travel should be considered woo and the paranormal is just in the process of accumulating enough evidence.
Well MWI seems particularly worthless to me, given its as yet fictional nature, but I wouldn't go so far as to say definitively that Psi or Spirit (if either exists) is related to entanglement or dark matter. Though according to Harris, Maverick Philosopher, Graeber and others you have to have consciousness at the start to avoid an ex nihilo event....so who knows? It might be possible there's consciousness in that quantum stuff somewhere.

Perhaps we need to take another look at Hammeroff's quantum soul proposal, given his and Penrose's Orch-Or posits consciousness exists at that level.

The aliens are a whole 'nother bag entirely. I still want to know what you think after reading Vallee's work.
 
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Sciborg_S_Patel

#14
Life, Extended Mind, and Fundamental Physics

The problem of how life came into existence is a major challenge for biology. I shall argue for an explanation involving the idea that a more elementary form of life, not dependent on matter, existed prior to the big bang, and evolved at the level of ideas in the same way that human societies evolve at the level of ideas. Just as human society discovered how to use matter in a range of technological applications, the hypothesised life before the big bang discovered how to organise energy to make physical universes, and to make fruitful use of the matter available in such universes.
 
#17
Well MWI seems particularly worthless to me, given its as yet fictional nature, but I wouldn't go so far as to say definitively that Psi or Spirit (if either exists) is related to entanglement or dark matter. Though according to Harris, Maverick Philosopher, Graeber and others you have to have consciousness at the start to avoid an ex nihilo event....so who knows? It might be possible there's consciousness in that quantum stuff somewhere.

Perhaps we need to take another look at Hammeroff's quantum soul proposal, given his and Penrose's Orch-Or posits consciousness exists at that level.

The aliens are a whole 'nother bag entirely. I still want to know what you think after reading Vallee's work.
If I had to extrapolate from large particles like molecules down to atoms, to subatomic particles, extrapolating down to quantum particles, and then quantum fields like the Higgs field (and Higgs boson), I would anticipate that there are a bunch more quantum fields that we don't know about. To me, the whole thing looks like aether. Basically, I believe that all of these quantum fields are equivalent to an aether of some kind, like a quantum aether. Like I've said before, I am surprized that the "wave-functions are real things" interpretation is not being considered by the physics community; it makes me think that they're hiding a fundamental quality of reality.

There is this assumption that all qualities of reality must square with physics or it doesn't exist. But I don't think that's true anymore. I think there will be a ton of mechanisms in biology that rely upon quantum entanglement.

But even then, I think that consciousness is beyond that. Consciousness is the part that experiences information. The ability to experience information (from neurochemicals) remains mysterious.

As for aliens, grey or otherwise, I'm not sure what the story is. Are there aliens in a neighboring star system who have figured out the warp drive and come here to earth to power down our nuclear missile systems and knock our missiles out of the sky? Maybe?


Or, are there aliens made of dark matter who ocasionally abduct human and drag them into their "dimension"? I'm not sure.
 
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Sciborg_S_Patel

#18
If I had to extrapolate from large particles like molecules down to atoms, to subatomic particles, extrapolating down to quantum particles, and then quantum fields like the Higgs field (and Higgs boson), I would anticipate that there are a bunch more quantum fields that we don't know about. To me, the whole thing looks like aether. Basically, I believe that all of these quantum fields are equivalent to an aether of some kind, like a quantum aether. Like I've said before, I am surprized that the "wave-functions are real things" interpretation is not being considered by the physics community; it makes me think that they're hiding a fundamental quality of reality.

There is this assumption that all qualities of reality must square with physics or it doesn't exist. But I don't think that's true anymore. I think there will be a ton of mechanisms in biology that rely upon quantum entanglement.

But even then, I think that consciousness is beyond that. Consciousness is the part that experiences information. The ability to experience information (from neurochemicals) remains mysterious.

As for aliens, grey or otherwise, I'm not sure what the story is. Are there aliens in a neighboring star system who have figured out the warp drive and come here to earth to power down our nuclear missile systems and knock our missiles out of the sky? Maybe?

Or, are there aliens made of dark matter who ocasionally abduct human and drag them into their "dimension"? I'm not sure.
When you say "hiding", do you mean a conspiracy? I sincerely doubt that, and I'm not one to trust Multiverse hypsters.

I'd also want to see more development on the quantum aether concept, as it's unclear to me what you mean. Are you talking about something like what John McGuire did in his essay?

I also lean to the position that consciousness remains beyond simple information processing, largely due to my opinion on semiotics and how computers only have what Searle calls "derived intentionality". Ross over on The Bottom Layer puts this well in The Program and the User:

Just as it seems to me that a computer program implies a programmer, it also seems to me that a computer program implies a user. Given the fact that we humans experience the programming, it does not seem to be a great reach to infer that we are the users for whom the simulation has been created.

If we accept that hypothesis, there is no need to wonder how consciousness can arise from programming. It does not. It exists independently, and it experiences the programming. Without the user, the programming would be quite pointless. And we cannot assume that the programming is pointless, because Somebody went to a great deal of trouble to create it.
As for the identity of "Somebody" - ever a contentious question! - see the lecture above from Josephson for one possibility.

On the subject of aliens - I still think that if we're going to venture out and claim they're real that Vallee's ideas are better than any nuts & bolts position.
 
#19
When you say "hiding", do you mean a conspiracy? I sincerely doubt that, and I'm not one to trust Multiverse hypsters.

I'd also want to see more development on the quantum aether concept, as it's unclear to me what you mean. Are you talking about something like what John McGuire did in his essay?

I also lean to the position that consciousness remains beyond simple information processing, largely due to my opinion on semiotics and how computers only have what Searle calls "derived intentionality". Ross over on The Bottom Layer puts this well in The Program and the User:



As for the identity of "Somebody" - ever a contentious question! - see the lecture above from Josephson for one possibility.

On the subject of aliens - I still think that if we're going to venture out and claim they're real that Vallee's ideas are better than any nuts & bolts position.
After many arguments with atheists, I find there belief (or lack of belief) in the paranormal to be highly emotionally charged to the point of being irrational. When confronted with the idea the wave-functions might really exist, engineers and chemists will say that they suspected it, but atheist-physicists will deny it and demand proof, proof starting with a 300 page explanation of why 2+2=4. Sometimes I think that atheist-physicists are some of the most "out of touch with reality" human beings I have ever met. They are out of touch in the sense that they don't see anything special or magical about consciousness itself. And they conspire to mislead everyone into believing that consciousness is nothing more than atoms.
 
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Sciborg_S_Patel

#20
After many arguments with atheists, I find there belief (or lack of belief) in the paranormal to be highly emotionally charged to the point of being irrational. When confronted with the idea the wave-functions might really exist, engineers and chemists will say that they suspected it, but atheist-physicists will deny it and demand proof, proof starting with a 300 page explanation of why 2+2=4. Sometimes I think that atheist-physicists are some of the most "out of touch with reality" human beings I have ever met. They are out of touch in the sense that they don't see anything special or magical about consciousness itself. And they conspire to mislead everyone into believing that consciousness is nothing more than atoms.
I do think a lot of people join up with the skeptical movement to gain some kind of retrocausal revenge against the religion(s) which surrounded them in their youth. That or they've been taken in by false mediums or whatever, and project that vulnerability toward deception onto the rest of the population that thus needs their paternalistic attititude.

All that said I'm not sure how the reality of the wave function leads to the existence of ghosts unless you posit the kind of panpsychism Orch-Or suggests.
 
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