Orch-OR and Schrodinger's Cat

#1
There have been some allegedly positive evidence for Orch-OR recently.
Suppose that it becomes generally accepted as a theory, how would it affect the interpretation of QM?

Is the cat alive or dead when we're not looking?
Is the moon there when no one looks?
 
#3
There have been some allegedly positive evidence for Orch-OR recently.
Suppose that it becomes generally accepted as a theory, how would it affect the interpretation of QM?

Is the cat alive or dead when we're not looking?
Is the moon there when no one looks?
Do you have a link to the evidence?

David
 
Last edited:
#6
There have been some allegedly positive evidence for Orch-OR recently.
Suppose that it becomes generally accepted as a theory, how would it affect the interpretation of QM?

Is the cat alive or dead when we're not looking?
Is the moon there when no one looks?
Haha, this is my favorite topic because the more I read and learn about it the more I notice how vast the mystery is :)
It also reminds me of a similar conversation I had somewhere else.

At this point of my journey through QM I am wondering if the wave function is a "real thing" or not :D Well... if Orch-OR had some positive evidence I guess we could settle the problem. As far as I understand it Penrose says that electrons, for example, can be physically in multiple states at the same time until they reach a certain amount of energy and then they "collapse" to a single particle.
 
#7
Here's Hameroff talking about Orch OR, it's a good overview of what it is and what he believes are supporting evidence for it in mostly layman terms.

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1571064513001188
Here's the paper he and Penross published recently, this is a lot more involved and technical.

Thanks very much for the references. That field has developed quite a bit in the last few years. The interview is great - it's the most recent thing I've heard from Hameroff and very easy to follow. I highly recommend it to anyone interested in how the brain may plausibly interface with the mind. I'll try to wade through the paper:eek:.

Intuitively, Hameroff and Penrose's arguments have a lot of appeal for me because they form a seemingly coherent explanation of how the brain may operate as a massive quantum computer, an important step in tying the rather scattered evidence together IMO. Also, Hameroff is quite forthright in stating his belief that this approach naturally encompasses such phenomena as psi effects, NDEs, and the possibility of an "afterlife," although Penrose still demures. Finally, from my (lay) point of view, Hameroff and Penrose seem to make mincemeat of the more simplistic arguments from some singularitarians (e.g., huge computational capacity equals consciousness). Great stuff!
 
Top