Mod+ Plant Intelligence

#3
Thank you for moving this discussion to this forum. I've had this discussion before with skeptics and it's tiresome. It's a topic I've been following for many years. You don't need the New Scientist article to read about this, there is a lot of good information out there.

It's not a popular mainstream subject because it casts serious doubts on clear cutting; the logging practice of taking out all the trees in a given area, basically laying waste to a hundred acres at a time.
Trees care for their offspring. Mycorrhiza, a type of fungus is used by their root systems to carry information and nutrients to young trees. It's a symbiotic relationship.
Plants and trees also communicate with insects and other bugs through chemical signals, which they use to alert predators to their prey, which happen to be eating the plants/trees.
Walnut trees have been shown to self administer a kind of aspirin to themselves when under stress, indicating a kind of pain awareness in trees.

The list goes on . . .
 
#4
Thank you for moving this discussion to this forum. I've had this discussion before with skeptics and it's tiresome. It's a topic I've been following for many years. You don't need the New Scientist article to read about this, there is a lot of good information out there.

It's not a popular mainstream subject because it casts serious doubts on clear cutting; the logging practice of taking out all the trees in a given area, basically laying waste to a hundred acres at a time.
Trees care for their offspring. Mycorrhiza, a type of fungus is used by their root systems to carry information and nutrients to young trees. It's a symbiotic relationship.
Plants and trees also communicate with insects and other bugs through chemical signals, which they use to alert predators to their prey, which happen to be eating the plants/trees.
Walnut trees have been shown to self administer a kind of aspirin to themselves when under stress, indicating a kind of pain awareness in trees.

The list goes on . . .
this would almost prove that panpsychism is true. Or some sort of sentience underlines all of nature.
 
#6
this would almost prove that panpsychism is true. Or some sort of sentience underlines all of nature.
But it is what separates the inanimate from the animate. And we are not even sure what that quality exactly is.
We do not have to concern ourselves with the autoresponse biological processes of our physical forms. I am reasonably sure the plant also does not have to concern itself with how it is perceiving through whatever sort of senses it may have. The structures of which are genetically encoded and not any property of matter.
 
#7
You turn a lot of assumptions on it's head if you accept plant consciousness. Neuroscience cannot be the answer.
Some plants can grow back from a tiny bit of root left in the gound. What happens to a plants consciousness when you clone it?
Does it split? Was there anything to split? And what is splitting? Perhaps just perspective.

Clones do grow better in the vicinity of the parent though. Very interesting. I have been watching a hawawian baby woodrose grow along my fence over the last few months, as soon as it got to a position on the fence where a palm tree was on the other side, it shot one single vine stretching well over a meter reaching directly for the trunk of the palm. If it were in timelapse it would be very hard not to take intentionality away from it. These sort of things are every where, you just have to look.
 
Top