Quantum tunneling mystery solved?

#2
Another quote:
"A very interesting paradox arises, because electron velocity during tunneling may become greater than the speed of light. However, this does not contradict the special theory of relativity, as the tunneling velocity is also imaginary"
 
#3
Well... I guess, the electron does not really "move". It disappears at point A and reappears at point B. It's not really moving in space, if I get it right.

If you're not moving in space-time, you don't have speed limits ;)
 
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#4
"A very interesting paradox arises, because electron velocity during tunneling may become greater than the speed of light. However, this does not contradict the special theory of relativity, as the tunneling velocity is also imaginary" said Dr Ivanov
Ehrm, what? Can anyone explain that to me in English?

So, in order to keep STR intact, time must be imaginary?
 
#6
It's not so much a question of keeping it intact as it is a fallout from the mathematics. ~~ Paul
As objects move faster, time speeds up. So in this case, since the electron moved instantaneously, it would either a) violate SRT (nothing with mass can move faster than light) or b) violate the notion of time.

But, faster than light travel may not be as impossible as we presume. It's an older paper but,
http://m.livescience.com/23789-einstein-relativity-faster-than-light-travel.html

Either way, you either upend the notion of faster than light travel or you upend the notion of time.
 
#9
Hmmm . .interesting for me on some levels. Those levels being within my "physical only" interests . However on the "big picture actuality" scale it fails as they posit time as a fundamental rather than what it is - a functional viewpoint.
 
#10
The tunnel effect is a corollary of the uncertainty principle: a electron that not having a full determined position, there is a possibility distinct of zero that a electron is located behind an impenetrable barrier.
 
#11
I saw an experience of interferometry whith tunnelling effect: it's called supraluminous tunnelling effect.
I think it's not the uncertainly principle that is involved but the schrodinger equation: the photon as a probabitlity to materialise on the other side of the tunnel, in fact it as the probability to materialise everywhere in space with a low probability
 
#12
I saw an experience of interferometry whith tunnelling effect: it's called supraluminous tunnelling effect.
I think it's not the uncertainly principle that is involved but the schrodinger equation: the photon as a probabitlity to materialise on the other side of the tunnel, in fact it as the probability to materialise everywhere in space with a low probability
This is an interesting distinction, thanks.
 
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