Reincarnation thought experiment.

#1
This is just something that occurred to me recently. If consciousness and awareness is fundamental, as is becoming more prominent. Then reincarnation as any kind of being, is almost a certainty. I don't imagine that it would include memories of a past life, as they seem intimately tied to the brain. Nonetheless, some kind of rebirth seems almost to be guaranteed. Thoughts?
 
#2
There's a degree of correlation between traumatic death (by murder, for example) and reports of past life memories. Maybe if one lives out a natural life, one is less likely for some reason to have past life memories. Maybe, for example, one (that is, one's spirit or essence) wants to "close the book" and make a fresh start, whereas if taken by a traumatic incident, one is still attached to unresolved issues, and so to some extent memories are retained because one wants to deal with those.

This is pure speculation, of course; as you requested, just my initial thoughts.
 
#3
If consciousness and awareness is fundamental, as is becoming more prominent. Then reincarnation as any kind of being, is almost a certainty.
I do not see that if consciousness is fundamental, then the reincarnation necessarily happens.

I don't imagine that it would include memories of a past life, as they seem intimately tied to the brain. Nonetheless, some kind of rebirth seems almost to be guaranteed.
There are cases Stevenson type. What I do not find any sense is to believe in reincarnation if no one had memories of a past life.
 
#4
This is just something that occurred to me recently. If consciousness and awareness is fundamental, as is becoming more prominent. Then reincarnation as any kind of being, is almost a certainty. I don't imagine that it would include memories of a past life, as they seem intimately tied to the brain. Nonetheless, some kind of rebirth seems almost to be guaranteed. Thoughts?
I'd recommend reading Joan Grant's "Many Lifetimes." She's a clairvoyant with an enhanced ability for "far recall" as she calls it. I read it a long time ago and thought it was probably just nonsense. Years later when researching Stevenson's cases involving birthmarks, deformities, and scars, it sounded just like the form of "memory" that Grant was describing.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joan_Grant

I'm surprised this wasn't edited out yet:

"Winged Pharaoh" was claimed by some to in fact be a re-incarnationist autobiography. Historians claimed that the calendar used in the book had never existed and also that there was no evidence whatsoever for the existence of an avenue of trees referred to in the book. After World War II a text was found which when translated proved to be the calendar referred to by Grant in the 1937 book.
Cheers,
Bill
 
#5
I'd recommend reading Joan Grant's "Many Lifetimes." She's a clairvoyant with an enhanced ability for "far recall" as she calls it. I read it a long time ago and thought it was probably just nonsense. Years later when researching Stevenson's cases involving birthmarks, deformities, and scars, it sounded just like the form of "memory" that Grant was describing.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joan_Grant

I'm surprised this wasn't edited out yet:



Cheers,
Bill
The skeptic in me would say lucky guess. But I must admit, that would be disingenuous.
 
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