Sam Harris is not an eliminativist

#1
I've been reading Waking Up by Sam Harris over the past couple of weeks. Here are some quotations from the book that show that he is definitely not an eliminativist.


It is surely a sign of intellectual progress that a discussion of consciousness need no longer begin with a debate about its existence. To say that consciousness may only seem to exist, from the inside, is to admit its existence in full - for if things seem any way at all, that is consciousness.

Consciousness is the one thing in this universe that cannot be an illusion.

I am sympathetic with those who, like the philosopher Colin McGinn and the psychologist Steven Pinker, have suggested that perhaps the emergence of consciousness is simply incomprehensible in human terms.

This situation has been characterized as an "explanatory gap" and as the "hard problem of consciousness," and it is surely both.

Despite the obvious importance of the unconscious mind, consciousness is what matters to us - not just for the purpose of spiritual practice but in every aspect of our lives. Consciousness is the substance of any experience we can have and hope for, now or in the future.
 
#2
Despite the obvious importance of the unconscious mind, consciousness is what matters to us
Actually the conscious portion of the psyche has been demonstrated in depth psychology to be the proverbial tip of the iceberg of what makes up "consciousness" or the human psyche. This has been well established. The exclusive focus upon the ego "conscious" portion of the psyche, Carl Jung insisted was one of the greatest fallacies of modern man, and could very well lead to his own self-destruction.

Without the unconscious, there would be no "conscious" ego. And without understanding the unconscious, you will have but a grade school understanding of the conscious.

My Best,
Bertha
 
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