Telepathy test: which number did I write?

#1
Hi, I invite you to participate in a simple telepathy test.

At about 1:00 p.m. on this Wednesday March 30 (Brussels, Belgium time), I wrote carefully one of the three numbers: "2", "3", "4" on my sheet of paper, and I surrounded it with a circle. Then, I wrote it again twice.

I shall repeat this number from time to time during this test and I ask you to write it here (if you think you know it, even with a doubt). You may also answer "I don't know".

It might perhaps be useful also that you write some comment, for example by saying how confident you are in your answer.

Thank you for participating.
 
#2
2.
I'm feeling pretty confident about it, but in a totally irrational way, so I would most certainly not make any decision based on a similar feeling. Btw I'm in Brussels, too, let's see if being fairly close to you helps :)
 
#4
Thank you for your answers, hypermagda (Magda, I suppose) and Steve.
By the way, a possible relationship between telepathy and distance is one of the things that concerns me most these days. I suspect that this relationship does exist, but is small, and therefore difficult to detect.
 

Ian Gordon

Ninshub
Member
#5
Michael, I'll wait a bit before responding. But I just thought I'd tell you that yesterday I thought about you and your telepathy threads, and wondering about how I would respond next if you put one up. Precognition?

EDIT: When I saw the thread title, the number that came to mind was "2". Low confidence.
 
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#6
Michael, I'll wait a bit before responding. But I jut thought I'd tell you that yesterday I thought about you and your telepathy threads, and wondering about how I would respond next if you put one up. Precognition?
This is interesting.
Precognition? I don't think so (at least not in the strict sense). In my opinion, you may have experienced telepathy, by perceiving my idea of starting a new test here. I believe that I am a "special" telepathic emitter, even if this idea is not exactly welcome in some circles ;)
 
P

PTEHA

#7
I believe that I am a "special" telepathic emitter
Hi Michel, Beliefs can be very powerful. That doesn't make them correct or incorrect, imo, only just another belief. {this is a bit of a long rave fwiw}

How about this: "I believe "we" are all telepathic emitters and receivers by default. And we are all special in our own right no matter how good we may be relative to other's telepathic ability or their awareness about it."
While I respect and understand your motivation and good intentions with your test, I think such things are self-defeating and counter-productive. The key issue (to me) being what are the fundamental assumptions such tests are based upon? I think the assumptions would add up to a very long a long list if it included all participants potentially involved. What is the purpose of it or what are you trying to "prove"? To prove you are a telepathic emitter? It seems like an odd way to go about it. Because if you are, then wouldn't you already know that without needing a test like this? [These are sincere open ended rhetorical questions I am asking, not pretend statements of opinion]

Let me throw in a few ideas and things I think are worth considering. What if instead of giving you a number I reported that when you first wrote the number on Wed. that you were wearing black undershorts. And let's say that was actually correct. Or what if you couldn't remember what colour underpants you were wearing? Or what if you never wear them? What does any of that "prove" one way or the other?

I'm driving to work one day and stopped at the red traffic lights. Suddenly the thought of my uncle comes to mind. I hadn't seen him for many years nor heard of him, and we were never close anyway. he had nothing to do with anything on my mind or my current life circumstances. I carried onto to work arriving about 30 minutes later. As I walked into the office the receptionist said to me "Oh, you got a phone call from your uncle Peter, he asked if you could give him a call, here's his number." I replied, "Oh really, when did he call?" "Oh about half an hour ago", said the receptionist. Who is the "special telepath emitter" here? Is it my Uncle or the receptionist? Or perhaps, is it myself who is the ultra-special psychic?

I recall reading up about the "remote viewing tests" supposedly being done in the US secret services with scientologists and others, including using drugs like LSD and so on. There's also been many others done using cards and symbols, or what's in a box stored in the next room etc etc etc. Despite these being more regulated, controlled and recorded, I see the very same problems here regarding what are the assumptions and what are they trying to "prove" by such "tests" anyway? Do they actually prove anything one can hang their hat on with confidence or is it a matter of belief overriding good scientific practice? [I am not saying that "science" has all the answers nor is it the only possible source for answers - but if one is looking for X but using faulty assumptions to design a test then it doesn't matter what the test results might say or suggest, imo]

Another aspect is the number is uncountable of when family members and close friends come to an awareness, or have a dream with, someone who has just recently died, but they didn't know "consciously" that they had died. There are mothers or wives or just "know" their loved one is dead, before any news comes to them about it. Such anecdotal reports as these (i believe) come from all tribal groups, all races, all religious leanings and across centuries of recorded history in human life. How would one set up a "study or test" to see if these reports were real and repeatable? How could such requests for self-reporting ever be measured properly in any definitive way? I don't think they can be. Would anyone believe it anyway unless they had had similar experiences or known personally people who had?

How would a test about what is the number written down on a sheet of paper compare to the personal (and usually profound) experience of such people? If an atheist or skeptic scoffed at such reports and dismissed them out of hand because there was no "scientific evidence or proof" then what difference does that make anyway? Are they all liars since before the pyramids were built? And what about the billions more humans on earth that have had close relatives die and yet never had such "precognition"? Does the weight of the far higher numbers prove the others were wrong? Logically, I don't think they would.

Have folks heard of "The Crocodile Hunter " aka Steve Irwin (RIP). He was not interested in or known of around esoteric consciousness spirituality religion or science circles at all. But in fact he was quite an intriguing fellow with much more behind what he was most well known for. He slept very little, one to a few hours each night. He had a midas touch and depth of sincerity rarely seen in TV celebrities. His relationship with Terri his wife, his parents and his children and coworkers was wonderful. Before he died I heard him speaking in an interview about his mother. One day early in the morning he was overcome by thoughts of his mother. His "instincts/intuition" insisted he jump in his 4WD and drive north. He kept driving and driving but without not knowing exactly "why". It made no sense. 600 klms later he comes across a recent car accident on the highway. He found his mother dead there. (That is my recall of the story, it may not be 100% correct. Best check the facts for yourself and not "believe" me [or anyone for that matter])

In the late 1960s (?) I was really taken by the song/poem Desiderata by Les Crane which was a hit record. In an incomprehensible world (to me) of Vietnam wars, James Bond movies, hippies and Hare Krishnas dancing on the streets down town, it rang very "true" to me as a youth. Decades later I was researching the history of that. It was said that it came from St Paul's church Boston in the 1600s. That was the accepted "belief" or rather supposedly "known facts" about it. But in reality it was penned by a christian in the 1940s, or is that the 1930s - it's a fascinating real story nevertheless? Desiderata's last stanza was also supposed to end with "Be careful. Strive to be happy."

But the original actually went: "Be Cheerful. Strive to be happy." One word can make all the difference. The details, or rather, the real facts, actually really do matter. aka "the devil is in the details" - as well as "it is easy to miss the forest for the trees." :)

Bruce Lee was one of my most favourite movie stars when a teen. I think he and Steve Erwin have a lot in common. Bruce would introduce quite a few "buddhist/human wisdom" sayings into his scripts. One from Enter the Dragon goes like this: "Don't mistake the finger pointing to the moon for the light which illuminates the finger." (sic) The moral of the story is that "appearances can be and are deceiving". Another way of putting that is "what might be thought of as obvious to most, isn't what is really most important and obvious."

Or: One man's obvious is another man's mystery.

You see I cannot abide by those who try to use esoteric/psi phenomena to rail against the flaws and limitations in science. Humanity stands upon the shoulders of giants, imo. And yet I also cannot abide by the fanatical fundamentalists who try and use science to rail against the esotericist, the artists, and the spiritual/consciousness modus operandi either. I am unaware of any mathematics that can prove the reality of poetry or why it works. Nor a scientific hypotheses of why listening to beautiful bird songs alone in a forest brings such joy to a human heart and eases one's mind and suffering so easily. Both sides of this "apparent" dilemma belong to the very same coin, imo. Meanwhile heart surgery, whilst painful and risky, actually does works. That's science in action and not a mystery.

I have nothing to sell and am pushing no barrow. If I do have an intention it is simply to encourage thinking deeply about such matters and to only hold to one's beliefs ever so lightly. Someone once put it to me that we are all "schizophrenic" in a way. Coexisting in two separate worlds, one materialist and scientific and another more fluid or spiritual. Where we all tend to line up in our own peculiar spot on the bell curve. aka "Horses for courses?" Each of us individually and collectively "matter" and are "special", imo. Or perhaps a more mundane way of putting that is "Best to not cut off your nose to spite your face." Be yourself, anyway. :)

I am sorry this was long winded, and especially if you got to the end only to be disappointed with what was said. In the meantime, I'll leave off with "Be cheerful and strive to be happy!" :)
 
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#8
Hi Michel, Beliefs can be very powerful. That doesn't make them correct or incorrect, imo, only just another belief. {this is a bit of a long rave fwiw}

How about this: "I believe "we" are all telepathic emitters and receivers by default. And we are all special in our own right no matter how good we may be relative to other's telepathic ability or their awareness about it."
While I respect and understand your motivation and good intentions with your test, I think such things are self-defeating and counter-productive. The key issue (to me) being what are the fundamental assumptions such tests are based upon? I think the assumptions would add up to a very long a long list if it included all participants potentially involved. What is the purpose of it or what are you trying to "prove"? To prove you are a telepathic emitter? It seems like an odd way to go about it. Because if you are, then wouldn't you already know that without needing a test like this? [These are sincere open ended rhetorical questions I am asking, not pretend statements of opinion]

Let me throw in a few ideas and things I think are worth considering. What if instead of giving you a number I reported that when you first wrote the number on Wed. that you were wearing black undershorts. And let's say that was actually correct. Or what if you couldn't remember what colour underpants you were wearing? Or what if you never wear them? What does any of that "prove" one way or the other?

I'm driving to work one day and stopped at the red traffic lights. Suddenly the thought of my uncle comes to mind. I hadn't seen him for many years nor heard of him, and we were never close anyway. he had nothing to do with anything on my mind or my current life circumstances. I carried onto to work arriving about 30 minutes later. As I walked into the office the receptionist said to me "Oh, you got a phone call from your uncle Peter, he asked if you could give him a call, here's his number." I replied, "Oh really, when did he call?" "Oh about half an hour ago", said the receptionist. Who is the "special telepath emitter" here? Is it my Uncle or the receptionist? Or perhaps, is it myself who is the ultra-special psychic?

I recall reading up about the "remote viewing tests" supposedly being done in the US secret services with scientologists and others, including using drugs like LSD and so on. There's also been many others done using cards and symbols, or what's in a box stored in the next room etc etc etc. Despite these being more regulated, controlled and recorded, I see the very same problems here regarding what are the assumptions and what are they trying to "prove" by such "tests" anyway? Do they actually prove anything one can hang their hat on with confidence or is it a matter of belief overriding good scientific practice? [I am not saying that "science" has all the answers nor is it the only possible source for answers - but if one is looking for X but using faulty assumptions to design a test then it doesn't matter what the test results might say or suggest, imo]

Another aspect is the number is uncountable of when family members and close friends come to an awareness, or have a dream with, someone who has just recently died, but they didn't know "consciously" that they had died. There are mothers or wives or just "know" their loved one is dead, before any news comes to them about it. Such anecdotal reports as these (i believe) come from all tribal groups, all races, all religious leanings and across centuries of recorded history in human life. How would one set up a "study or test" to see if these reports were real and repeatable? How could such requests for self-reporting ever be measured properly in any definitive way? I don't think they can be. Would anyone believe it anyway unless they had had similar experiences or known personally people who had?

How would a test about what is the number written down on a sheet of paper compare to the personal (and usually profound) experience of such people? If an atheist or skeptic scoffed at such reports and dismissed them out of hand because there was no "scientific evidence or proof" then what difference does that make anyway? Are they all liars since before the pyramids were built? And what about the billions more humans on earth that have had close relatives die and yet never had such "precognition"? Does the weight of the far higher numbers prove the others were wrong? Logically, I don't think they would.

Have folks heard of "The Crocodile Hunter " aka Steve Irwin (RIP). He was not interested in or known of around esoteric consciousness spirituality religion or science circles at all. But in fact he was quite an intriguing fellow with much more behind what he was most well known for. He slept very little, one to a few hours each night. He had a midas touch and depth of sincerity rarely seen in TV celebrities. His relationship with Terri his wife, his parents and his children and coworkers was wonderful. Before he died I heard him speaking in an interview about his mother. One day early in the morning he was overcome by thoughts of his mother. His "instincts/intuition" insisted he jump in his 4WD and drive north. He kept driving and driving but without not knowing exactly "why". It made no sense. 600 klms later he comes across a recent car accident on the highway. He found his mother dead there. (That is my recall of the story, it may not be 100% correct. Best check the facts for yourself and not "believe" me [or anyone for that matter])

In the late 1960s (?) I was really taken by the song/poem Desiderata by Les Crane which was a hit record. In an incomprehensible world (to me) of Vietnam wars, James Bond movies, hippies and Hare Krishnas dancing on the streets down town, it rang very "true" to me as a youth. Decades later I was researching the history of that. It was said that it came from St Paul's church Boston in the 1600s. That was the accepted "belief" or rather supposedly "known facts" about it. But in reality it was penned by a christian in the 1940s, or is that the 1930s - it's a fascinating real story nevertheless? Desiderata's last stanza was also supposed to end with "Be careful. Strive to be happy."

But the original actually went: "Be Cheerful. Strive to be happy." One word can make all the difference. The details, or rather, the real facts, actually really do matter. aka "the devil is in the details" - as well as "it is easy to miss the forest for the trees." :)

Bruce Lee was one of my most favourite movie stars when a teen. I think he and Steve Erwin have a lot in common. Bruce would introduce quite a few "buddhist/human wisdom" sayings into his scripts. One from Enter the Dragon goes like this: "Don't mistake the finger pointing to the moon for the light which illuminates the finger." (sic) The moral of the story is that "appearances can be and are deceiving". Another way of putting that is "what might be thought of as obvious to most, isn't what is really most important and obvious."

Or: One man's obvious is another man's mystery.

You see I cannot abide by those who try to use esoteric/psi phenomena to rail against the flaws and limitations in science. Humanity stands upon the shoulders of giants, imo. And yet I also cannot abide by the fanatical fundamentalists who try and use science to rail against the esotericist, the artists, and the spiritual/consciousness modus operandi either. I am unaware of any mathematics that can prove the reality of poetry or why it works. Nor a scientific hypotheses of why listening to beautiful bird songs alone in a forest brings such joy to a human heart and eases one's mind and suffering so easily. Both sides of this "apparent" dilemma belong to the very same coin, imo. Meanwhile heart surgery, whilst painful and risky, actually does works. That's science in action and not a mystery.

I have nothing to sell and am pushing no barrow. If I do have an intention it is simply to encourage thinking deeply about such matters and to only hold to one's beliefs ever so lightly. Someone once put it to me that we are all "schizophrenic" in a way. Coexisting in two separate worlds, one materialist and scientific and another more fluid or spiritual. Where we all tend to line up in our own peculiar spot on the bell curve. aka "Horses for courses?" Each of us individually and collectively "matter" and are "special", imo. Or perhaps a more mundane way of putting that is "Best to not cut off your nose to spite your face." Be yourself, anyway. :)

I am sorry this was long winded, and especially if you got to the end only to be disappointed with what was said. In the meantime, I'll leave off with "Be cheerful and strive to be happy!" :)
PTEHA, I agree with your statement that we are all telepathic emitters and receivers. However, in this area, just like in any other, there may be some exceptional cases. For example, Newton and Einstein were probably better than most people in studying physics. If the idea that I am an exceptional worldwide telepathic emitter and broadcaster causes some discomfort to you (I currently view this statement as being still a hypothesis, but one which is probably true), here is perhaps a good way of approaching this situation: being a "strong" telepathic emitter (probably because of some genetic reasons) does not make me better than anyone else; there are millions of people in the world (perhaps including you) who are far more gifted and better than me in lots of important areas (who are physically stronger, who can draw better, who are healthier and so on).
My motivation for doing these tests is both scientific (I have a Ph.D. in physics degree, I would like to elucidate this apparently remarkable phenomenon and to have it recognized by society, by scientists, by all), and practical: I often hear apparently telepathic voices in my head who are trying, 24 hours a day, to convince me to kill myself, because, they say, my telepathic waves cause insecurity, violent events in the world. This is not a lot of fun.
 
#9
My motivation for doing these tests is both scientific (I have a Ph.D. in physics degree, I would like to elucidate this apparently remarkable phenomenon and to have it recognized by society, by scientists, by all), and practical: I often hear apparently telepathic voices in my head who are trying, 24 hours a day, to convince me to kill myself, because, they say, my telepathic waves cause insecurity, violent events in the world. This is not a lot of fun.
Dear Michel, I live in Brussels like you, as I said in a previous post, and these are extremely difficult days for all of us living here, especially for good-hearted, sensitive people as you appear to be. Please do not take those voices in your head seriously, and do not even ever remotely contemplate doing what you think they are saying. You are most definitely NOT causing insecurity and violent events in the world with your 'telepathic waves'. And please seek medical help urgently instead of trying to "elucidate this apparently remarkable phenomenon" (as you put it) on this Forum. I for one believe that not all psi phenomena are "real", some are just due to some kind of (temporary) brain malfunction, and in my opinion this is the case with you at the moment, so please seek help urgently. Take care of yourself. Hugs.
 
#12
Correlation is not causation as everybody in this Forum will be able to confirm!
No, certainly not, and I am not telepathically urging terrorists to launch attacks, like those that occurred recently in Brussels. However, I believe I am a victim of a global criminal phenomenon, and a collective lie (this is certainly strange and unusual, but unusual things do happen; in addition I must be grateful to kind people who accept to participate in my tests and to a society which feeds me, as my mother pointed out to me recently), and I am sometimes wondering if a concept of collective punishment could not have some legitimacy in such a situation. Like: you tell me the truth, or ... ;)
 
#13
No, certainly not, and I am not telepathically urging terrorists to launch attacks, like those that occurred recently in Brussels. However, I believe I am a victim of a global criminal phenomenon, and a collective lie (this is certainly strange and unusual, but unusual things do happen; in addition I must be grateful to kind people who accept to participate in my tests and to a society which feeds me, as my mother pointed out to me recently), and I am sometimes wondering if a concept of collective punishment could not have some legitimacy in such a situation. Like: you tell me the truth, or ... ;)
dear Michel, I am afraid I do not understand what you are saying but I am glad to hear you have a wise mother looking after you....I wish you peace of mind, and once again (if you are not doing this already) please seek help. I say this with enormous respect as well as concern for your well being. I wish you all the very best.
 
#14
I wish you peace of mind, and once again (if you are not doing this already) please seek help.
I am already doing this; for example, I had a long discussion in September (2015) with a doctor in the Adult Psychiatry Department at at the Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc in Brussels. Perhaps I will go back there (or not, not quite sure it is really useful), or go see another psychiatrist. If I go see a psychiatrist again, I will perhaps show the doctor the results of this online telepathy test (and/or the results of other tests), this is one of the reasons why this test may be important to me. Generally speaking, doctors in Belgium (as you may know, since you live in Belgium) are fairly open-minded and interested, but that doesn't mean there are no problems.
 
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#15
I am already doing this; for example, I had a long discussion in September (2015) with a doctor in the Adult Psychiatry Department at at the Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc in Brussels. Perhaps I will go back there (or not, not quite sure it is really useful), or go see another psychiatrist. If I go see a psychiatrist again, I will perhaps show the doctor the results of this online telepathy test (and/or the results of other tests), this is one of the reasons why this test is important to me. Generally speaking, doctors in Belgium (as you may know, since you live in Belgium) are fairly open-minded and interested, but that doesn't mean there are no problems.
Great, please speak with a doctor, especially if you haven't spoken to one since September, and please be open to heed his/her opinion and advice, they have certainly met other people in your situation and I'm sure they will be able to help you in many different ways.
 
#16
please be open to heed his/her opinion and advice
This will not necessarily happen, because last time the doctor suggested I take an antipsychotic "medication" with serious side effects, which really has not been designed and tested to help people who suffer from telepathic phenomena. Doctors really don't have much of a clue about how to deal with cases like mine (I may be a unique case, an idea that is generally not very popular with people). Psychiatrists know what they have learnt in medical school; how to deal with exceptional telepathic cases is not taught there, I hope this could change.
 
#17
This will not necessarily happen, because last time the doctor suggested I take an antipsychotic "medication" with serious side effects, which really has not been designed and tested to help people who suffer from telepathic phenomena. Doctors really don't have much of a clue about how to deal with cases like mine (I may be a unique case, an idea that is generally not very popular with people). Psychiatrists know what they have learnt in medical school; how to deal with exceptional telepathic cases is not taught there, I hope this could change.
I hope our Skeptiko friend Alan Amsberg will see this thread and give you his advice (check out his posts in the meantime). In many of his posts here he has referred to a psychotic episode he suffered and I believe you would benefit from his experience, since you seem to distrust doctors wholesale. Hopefully he would be able to convince you that he has greatly benefited from medical help, I hope you will realise this, too. That's all I can say and do for you, sadly, apart from wishing you all the best.
 
#19
Michel,

I suggest that for your next test you select a number between 140 and 1022. The problem with picking between 3 numbers, is that you really need lots of trials to build up the statistics to distinguish ψ from chance.

Also you need to avoid small numbers that seem to attract people - including you, and those you are trying to connect with.

David
 
P

PTEHA

#20
If the idea that I am an exceptional worldwide telepathic emitter and broadcaster causes some discomfort to you
Hi Michel, no not at all. If anything, I was trying to offer some encouragement and to motivate you to design a better test. Good luck.
 
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