When death is certain

#1
I read this quote from Dostoevskys The Idiot:

"…Think! When there is torture there is pain and wounds, physical agony, and all this distracts the mind from mental suffering, so that one is tormented only by the wounds until the moment of death.

But the most terrible agony may not be in the wounds themselves but in knowing for certain that within an hour - then within ten minutes - then within half a minute - now at this very instant – your soul will leave your body and you will no longer be a person, and that is certain;- the worst thing is that it is certain."

The Idiot,
Dostoevsky.
....and it got me thinking. I've mentioned this before, and for me, the thought of being dead is not that worrying. I would say that is the actual `step´ that is most agonizing. Anyone who have had a death-threatening situation, of bodily character (meaning a sickness, heart attack or similar), knows how it feels.

The moment you feel its coming on, the build-up, when you "know" that this might `be it´, and no bargaining, argument, twisting and turning, or pleading will change this.
It feels like its actually the first time that you are not in control of your body - and it is about to fail on you.

About 5 million thoughts rush through your brain in one second, trying to find a "way out" of this. It doesn't matter if someone is there to hold your hand or not because they cant do anything to help you. `This´ is about to happen to you right now - and there is nothing you can do about it.

That is what I found most scary about dying - the moment of certainty.

I guess I'm not alone feeling like this.
 

Ian Gordon

Ninshub
Member
#2
I guess I'm not alone feeling like this.
No, you're not, Pollux.

But I remember reading this from PMH Atwater, and it soothes me some when I think of it:

HOW IT FEELS TO DIE

Any pain to be suffered comes first. Instinctively you fight to live. That is automatic. It is inconceivable to the conscious mind that any other reality could possibly exist beside the Earth-world of matter bounded by time and space. We are used to it. We have been trained since birth to live and thrive in it. We know ourselves to be ourselves by the external stimuli we receive. Life tells us who we are and we accept its telling. That, too, is automatic and to be expected.

Your body goes limp. Your heart stops. No more air flows in or out. You lose sight, feeling and movement - although the ability to hear goes last. Identity ceases. The "you" that you once were becomes only a memory.

There is no pain at the moment of death. Only peaceful silence ... calm ... quiet. But you still exist.

It is easy not to breathe. In fact, it is easier, more comfortable, and infinitely more natural not to breathe than to breathe.

The biggest surprise for most people in dying is to realize that dying does not end life. Whether darkness or light comes next, or some kind of event, be it positive, negative, or somewhere in between, expected or unexpected, the biggest surprise of all is to realize you are still you. You can still think, you can still remember, you can still see, hear, move, reason, wonder, feel, question, and tell jokes - if you wish.

You are still alive, very much alive. Actually, you're more alive after death than at any time since you were last born. Only the way of all this is different; different because you no longer wear a dense body to filter and amplify the various sensations you had once regarded as the only valid indicators of what constitutes life. You had always been taught one has to wear a body to live.

If you expect to die when you die you will be disappointed.

The only thing dying does is help you release, slough off, and discard the "jacket" you once wore (more commonly referred to as a body). When you die you lose your body. That's all there is to it. Nothing else is lost.

You are not your body. It is just something you wear for a while, because living in the Earth realm is infinitely more meaningful and more involved if you are encased in its trappings and subject to its rules.

WHAT DEATH IS

There is a step-up of energy at the moment of death, an increase in speed as if you are suddenly vibrating faster than before.

Using radio as an analogy, this speed-up is comparable to having lived all your life at a certain radio frequency when all of a sudden someone or something comes along and flips the dial. That flip shifts you to different frequency. The original frequency where you once existed is still there. It did not change. Everything is still just the same as it was. Only you changed, only you speeded up to allow entry into the next radio frequency on the dial.

As is true with all radios and radio stations, there can be bleed-overs or distortions of transmission signals due to interference patterns. These can allow or force frequencies to coexist or co-mingle for indefinite periods of time. Normally, most shifts up the dial are fast and efficient; but, occasionally, one can run into interference, perhaps from a strong emotion, a sense of duty, or a need to fulfill a vow, or keep a promise. This interference could allow coexistence of frequencies for a few seconds, days, or even years (perhaps explaining hauntings); but, sooner or later, eventually, every given vibrational frequency will seek out or be nudged to where it belongs.

You fit your particular spot on the dial by your speed of vibration. You cannot coexist forever where you do not belong. Who can say how many spots there are on the dial or how many frequencies there are to inhabit? No one knows. You shift frequencies in dying. You switch over to life on another wavelength. You are still a spot on the dial but you move up or down a notch or two. You don't die when you die. You shift your consciousness and speed of vibration. That's all death is. A shift.
http://www.near-death.com/science/experts/pmh-atwater.html
(p.s. I've reformatted this so that it's like how it appears in her book We Live Forever, 2004, A.R.E. Press, p. 88-90.)
 
#4
Pollux,

I think that if I am conscious and with enough time to think when my time comes, I will obviously feel scared, but I think that will be tempered by all I have read here and elsewhere. In short, I'll feel there is a good chance that another chapter in my existence will follow.

David
 
#5
The moment you feel its coming on, the build-up, when you "know" that this might `be it´, and no bargaining, argument, twisting and turning, or pleading will change this.
It feels like its actually the first time that you are not in control of your body - and it is about to fail on you.

About 5 million thoughts rush through your brain in one second, trying to find a "way out" of this. It doesn't matter if someone is there to hold your hand or not because they cant do anything to help you. `This´ is about to happen to you right now - and there is nothing you can do about it.

That is what I found most scary about dying - the moment of certainty.
Perhaps it is the moment of certainty that brings tranquility; choice has been removed. Many nurses have spoken about it, and some in life threatening situations. I don't know if you have seen this EMT talk about his experiences before, but I found it interesting.

https://www.ted.com/talks/matthew_o_reilly_am_i_dying_the_honest_answer?language=en
 
#7
I read this quote from Dostoevskys The Idiot:

"…Think! When there is torture there is pain and wounds, physical agony, and all this distracts the mind from mental suffering, so that one is tormented only by the wounds until the moment of death.

But the most terrible agony may not be in the wounds themselves but in knowing for certain that within an hour - then within ten minutes - then within half a minute - now at this very instant – your soul will leave your body and you will no longer be a person, and that is certain;- the worst thing is that it is certain."

The Idiot,
Dostoevsky.
....and it got me thinking. I've mentioned this before, and for me, the thought of being dead is not that worrying. I would say that is the actual `step´ that is most agonizing. Anyone who have had a death-threatening situation, of bodily character (meaning a sickness, heart attack or similar), knows how it feels.

The moment you feel its coming on, the build-up, when you "know" that this might `be it´, and no bargaining, argument, twisting and turning, or pleading will change this.
It feels like its actually the first time that you are not in control of your body - and it is about to fail on you.

About 5 million thoughts rush through your brain in one second, trying to find a "way out" of this. It doesn't matter if someone is there to hold your hand or not because they cant do anything to help you. `This´ is about to happen to you right now - and there is nothing you can do about it.

That is what I found most scary about dying - the moment of certainty.

I guess I'm not alone feeling like this.
Do you think being permantly trapped alone in a dark and isolated state of awareness for eternity would be scary?

Anyway, you don't have to worry about that because after awhile you'd become so evolved that you'd be creating your own realities and splitting off aspects of your mind into separate forms which would interact with each other and stuff.
 
#8
Pollux, have you been watching "It follows?"

It is the theme of this creepiest of horrors!!!! I just finished watching it and man, it is one messed up flick.
 
#10
Death is a boundary to our knowledge - obscuring, mystifying, terrifying, and tantalizing. Curiosity draws us to the boundaries of our knowledge and therefore to our own demise. Solomon and Marcus Aurelius agreed it's good to daily contemplate your own death. I do, and I must say I look forward to D-Day... not in a premature escapist suicidal way, but in the spirit of adventure and curiosity. I want to play this game and fully explore all earthly life has to offer and take before I take my last, but I can't think of anything more exciting or liberating than dying. I say that being presently unafflicted by any major mental or physical discomfort. Sure, there are terrible things in life that could forebode a terrifying experience after death, but I also see in all existence an unshakable balance between the binary oppositions, so I have utmost confidence (call it faith?) that the balance and the adventure will continue after death. Will I feel different when I approach the exact moment of mortality? Maybe... I'm curious to see how I'll handle it. :)
 
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#11
I think there are two reasons people are afraid of death, and, as someone who is down right terrified of it, I think I can speak from experience: the threat of eternal nothingness, and the threat of eternal punishment. Notice the emphasis on eternal. If we were in nothingness or in Hell for a thousand years, we'd suffer, we'd weep and gnash our teeth, we'd be burned by the unquenchable fire, but we would get out at some point and move on. We'd have the hope of having a better existence sometime. But if either threat is eternal... *shudder* I think any term of time in suffering/nothingness would be infinitely more tolerable than suffering/nothingness forever, don't you?
 
#12
Vistas of Eternity

I think that this latest book by Jurgel Ziewe provides answers to many of our questions and may ease many fears at the same time.

He, like Tom Campbell, has investigated different realms for over four decades. He is a genuine man that I have communicated with on and off for four years. I am almost totally convinced that this is the way to find out about how the afterlife might be for us. I am a 'fan' of NDE's and the realms that they see are a part of what Jurgen and Tom and others report in out of body travels.

As he says, he has only begun scratching the surface of what exists.

As the Monroe institute has reported for many years, there is a path to investigate that is quite accessible from this reality. I am not totally convinced that it is what we should be doing. If it is then what are we doing on earth in the first place?

His website is: multidimensionalman.com

The book can bo ordered from their now, but is coming out is a few weeks on Kindle/ Amazon.

I am not promoting this book for Jurgen, I really think it is the first answer to many questions that people are looking for.
 
#13
I think there are two reasons people are afraid of death, and, as someone who is down right terrified of it, I think I can speak from experience: the threat of eternal nothingness, and the threat of eternal punishment. Notice the emphasis on eternal. If we were in nothingness or in Hell for a thousand years, we'd suffer, we'd weep and gnash our teeth, we'd be burned by the unquenchable fire, but we would get out at some point and move on. We'd have the hope of having a better existence sometime. But if either threat is eternal... *shudder* I think any term of time in suffering/nothingness would be infinitely more tolerable than suffering/nothingness forever, don't you?
Justice is symbolized by the balancing scales. In human courts we attempt to make the punishment fit the crime and all sorts of things go into that ruling. In nature, we find all kinds of systems that exist in a delicate balance. In our own experience we are always in the middle between two binary oppositions: light/dark, up/down, left/right, etc... All of reality appears to be a balanced alternation between boundaries and spaces. The idea of infinite punishment seems to be unbalanced and therefore flies in the face of everything we see around us, so I don't believe in it.

And as for nothingness... how can one experience nothingness? I think there is an experience of what I like to call "the Abyss" or some call "the Void"... but that is still something and to keep the balance it must be contrasted with the Light or the Logos.

Finally, I don't worry about the length of time spent anywhere out of the body, because my understanding is that time is experienced totally differently when detached from the body. ...and that makes sense. Our bodies give us a particular perception of time due to the speed of reactions that take place within them.
 
#14
Justice is symbolized by the balancing scales. In human courts we attempt to make the punishment fit the crime and all sorts of things go into that ruling. In nature, we find all kinds of systems that exist in a delicate balance. In our own experience we are always in the middle between two binary oppositions: light/dark, up/down, left/right, etc... All of reality appears to be a balanced alternation between boundaries and spaces. The idea of infinite punishment seems to be unbalanced and therefore flies in the face of everything we see around us, so I don't believe in it.

And as for nothingness... how can one experience nothingness? I think there is an experience of what I like to call "the Abyss" or some call "the Void"... but that is still something and to keep the balance it must be contrasted with the Light or the Logos.

Finally, I don't worry about the length of time spent anywhere out of the body, because my understanding is that time is experienced totally differently when detached from the body. ...and that makes sense. Our bodies give us a particular perception of time due to the speed of reactions that take place within them.
Fascinating... I have to think on this.
 
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